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OPEC's Production Cuts Fail to Boost Oil Prices

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BNN Correspondents
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OPEC's Production Cuts Fail to Boost Oil Prices

In the shadow of a burgeoning economic slowdown, OPEC, the renowned oil cartel, has rolled out a new round of production cuts, aiming to shore up oil prices. However, this move has paradoxically spurred a decline in oil prices, with a drop of over $8.50 per barrel.

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The Promise and the Skepticism

OPEC's strategy comprises a cumulative reduction of 2.2 million barrels per day. This move, while ambitious, has stirred skepticism about its successful implementation. The reason for this distrust lies in the historical non-compliance of some OPEC members and the anticipated non-participation of countries like Iran, Angola, and Nigeria.

The Global Economy's Role

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Adding to OPEC's challenges is the cooling global economy, particularly in China, a major oil consumer. This economic deceleration has dampened demand for crude oil, further depressing prices. OPEC's balancing act between controlling prices and maintaining market share echoes their 2014 attempt to counter US shale oil production by increasing output, a strategy that eventually backfired.

Non-OPEC Producers Gain Ground

Complicating OPEC's predicament is the increased production from non-OPEC countries, chiefly the United States. US shale oil producers, seizing the opportunity presented by OPEC's cuts, are ramping up output. With US oil production at record levels and recent major acquisitions foreshadowing further increases in production and investment, OPEC's influence on oil prices appears to be waning.

These dynamics suggest that while OPEC and its allies may still be able to sway oil prices, their actions are inadvertently benefiting non-OPEC producers. This scenario could lead to market share losses for OPEC members, changing the global oil landscape.

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