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JFK’s Assassination: 60 Years On, The Conspiracy Theories and Cultural Impact

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Geeta Pillai
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JFK’s Assassination: 60 Years On, The Conspiracy Theories and Cultural Impact

A crisp autumn day, November 22, 1963, remains etched in the collective memory of the American nation. Marking the 60th anniversary of the assassination of John F. Kennedy, one of the most charismatic presidents America ever had, this article ventures into the labyrinth of popular culture's influence in shaping public perception of this historical event.

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The Conspiracy Theories and Their Proliferation

It seems that for most people, Lee Harvey Oswald, the man officially held responsible for the murder, was not the lone gunman but part of a well-orchestrated conspiracy. Over 1,500 conspiracy theories have surfaced, some even weaving narratives of extraterrestrial involvement. The district attorney who investigated the assassination, Jim Garrison, and his relentless pursuit of a perceived state coup on that fateful November day, have added fuel to the conspiracy fire.

The Role of Cinema: Oliver Stone's 'JFK'

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Oliver Stone's film 'JFK' is a significant contributor to the popularization of conspiracy beliefs surrounding Kennedy's assassination. This cinematic representation of the tragedy, along with others like 'Jackie,' 'Parkland,' 'Killing Kennedy,' and 'Fatal Deception: Mrs. Lee Harvey Oswald,' has served to keep the event alive in the public consciousness, exploring the complexities of the assassination and its aftermath.

Oswald: The Convenient Scapegoat?

The argument here lies in the seeming convenience of Oswald as the lone assassin. Oswald's psychological profile, biography, and the material evidence presented are as convincing as the conspiracy theories. Wouldn't the American government have found it more convenient to blame an external enemy such as Cuba, the Italian mafia, or the Soviet Union?

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Public Perception and the Power of Belief

The full truth about JFK's assassination may forever remain a mystery, even if all related archives were opened to the public. The human mind tends to believe what it wants to believe, often in alignment with its pre-conceived notions and biases. Art and popular culture continue to feed off the lingering trauma of Kennedy's death for many Americans, perpetuating the narrative and keeping the memory alive.

Kennedy and Kramberger: Parallels Across Continents

Interestingly, the narrative surrounding the assassination of Slovenian politician Ivan Kramberger mirrors that of Kennedy. Conspiracy theories abound, suggesting a similar narrative trajectory, feeding off the public's fascination with the unknown and the unexplained. Could it be that both Kennedy and Kramberger were victims of two troubled individuals acting on their own, rather than intricate conspiracies?

In conclusion, the absence of a memorial at the site of Kramberger's assassination contrasts sharply with the Americans' transformation of the site of Kennedy's death into a pop icon and a tourist attraction. This speaks volumes about the different ways societies remember and commemorate their heroes and their tragedies.

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