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Breakthrough in Graphene Research: World's First Functional Graphene Semiconductor

Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology create the world's first functional graphene semiconductor, overcoming hurdles and paving the way for a new era of electronics.

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Aqsa Younas Rana
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Breakthrough in Graphene Research: World's First Functional Graphene Semiconductor

A landmark in the realm of semiconductors, the world's first functional graphene semiconductor, has been engineered by a research team led by Walter de Heer at the Georgia Institute of Technology. The team achieved this feat by cultivating graphene on silicon carbide wafers, resulting in a semiconductor possessing ten times the mobility of silicon.

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Overcoming Graphene's Band Gap Hurdle

Graphene's lack of a band gap has long hindered its application within electronics. The band gap, an indispensable characteristic for semiconductors, allows them to switch on and off - a feature that was previously absent in graphene. However, the team at the Georgia Institute of Technology successfully overcame this obstacle, creating a graphene-based semiconductor that could revolutionize the electronics industry.

A Decade of Research and Collaboration

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The research, which involved collaboration with peers at the Tianjin International Center for Nanoparticles and Nanosystems in China, has been a decade in the making. The team's efforts have led to the creation of epitaxial graphene that could potentially provide a superior alternative to silicon in the world of electronics. The high mobility and compatibility of this new graphene semiconductor with current microelectronics processing methods make it a promising candidate for future nanoelectronics and quantum computing technologies.

Implications for the Future of Electronics

The development of this graphene semiconductor indicates a promising future where electrons can move with very little resistance, a boon for faster computing. The findings, published in the esteemed journal Nature, signal a shift towards graphene-based electronics, which could outperform traditional silicon-based technologies. As the research progresses, we may soon witness a new era of electronics, powered by this high-performance, graphene-based semiconductor.

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