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North Korea's Spy Satellite Launch Intensifies Crisis in the Korean Peninsula

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BNN Correspondents
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North Korea's Spy Satellite Launch Intensifies Crisis in the Korean Peninsula

The intensifying crisis between North and South Korea has fueled tensions in the Korean Peninsula and the Pacific region. The issue revolves around North Korea's launch of a military spy satellite, 'Malligeum-1', which captured images of high-profile targets including the White House, the Pentagon, a nuclear aircraft carrier, British aircraft, and various sites in South Korea and other vital installations. North Korean leader Kim Jong Un reviewed the images and counted the number of aircraft carriers at a U.S. base, receiving an operations report from Pyongyang's National Aerospace Development Administration.

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North Korea's Spy Satellite: A New Game Changer

The successful deployment of the spy satellite enhances North Korea's intelligence-gathering capabilities, particularly over South Korea, thus raising concerns in Seoul and Washington. The satellite's images have sparked fears of a potential escalation to a third world war, especially with rising tensions in the South China Sea, as per military expert Peter Alex. The matter has led to a heated session at the UN Security Council, where North Korea claimed the satellite launch was a legitimate act of self-defense, while the U.S. led a wave of condemnations.

(Read Also: Roscosmos Plans Naming New Orbital Station; North Korea’s Spy Satellite Probes Global Locations)

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The International Response

Western powers, Japan, and South Korea have argued that North Korea violated UN Security Council resolutions by launching the spy satellite. North Korea's envoy Kim Song retorted that other countries face no restrictions on satellite use and argued that possessing weapons systems equal to those of the U.S. is a legitimate right for North Korea. The U.S. representative Linda Thomas-Greenfield dismissed the North Korean delegate's statements, emphasizing that U.S.-South Korea military drills are routine and defensive.

(Read Also: North Korea’s Satellite Launch: Claims, Criticisms and Consequences)

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What's Next?

South Korea has postponed the planned launch of its first military spy satellite. Under a contract with SpaceX, South Korea aims to launch five spy satellites by 2025. South Korea currently has no military reconnaissance satellites of its own and partially resorts to U.S. spy satellites to monitor North Korea's moves. The escalating tensions on the Korean Peninsula and the Pacific region underscore the urgent need for diplomatic solutions and dialogue to prevent the situation from spiraling out of control.

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