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The Esequibo Dispute: A Tale of Geopolitics, History, and Resource Scramble

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Nitish Verma
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The Esequibo Dispute: A Tale of Geopolitics, History, and Resource Scramble

In a whirlwind of geopolitics and historical contention, the century-old territorial dispute over the Esequibo region has once again been thrust into the limelight. The Esequibo's tale is one deeply ingrained in the historical fabric of Venezuela, the United Kingdom, and Guyana, marked by complex international implications, historical claims, and a never-ending quest for natural resources.

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The Historical Canvas

The saga traces its roots back to the Capitanía General de Venezuela, which historically defined its eastern boundary coinciding with the Essequibo River. This boundary was recognized cartographically as the dividing line, but the colonial era's flexible borders, dictated by the colonizers' reach, left vast Amazonian territories unclaimed. This focus on coastal areas for economic and strategic reasons laid the groundwork for later conflicts.

The Arbitral Award of 1899 & Its Controversies

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After Venezuelan independence, the territory of the former Capitanía General was claimed as the nation's rightful map, clashing with British colonial interests. The controversial Arbitral Award of 1899, which recognized the Esequibo as part of Guyana without Venezuelan participation, is deemed invalid by Venezuela, which insists on voluntary state involvement in such arbitrations. The discovery of oil in 1875 further fanned the flames of contention, with British interests clearly in play as the Royal Dutch Shell, a British company, initiated oil exploration in 1913.

The Modern-Day Melodrama

The dispute has been rekindled in 2023, following Guyana's approval of oil exploration by six hydrocarbon companies. This move is perceived as a violation of the 1966 Geneva Agreement, which was bilateral and respected Venezuela's consent, unlike the 1899 Award. The discovery of rich deposits of oil, gold, coltan, copper, iron, bauxite, and aluminum, coupled with the strategic geographical importance of the region, has only added fuel to the fire. Despite political differences, Venezuelans view the recovery of the Esequibo as a collective debt of all governments since 1899.

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