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The Dark Side of Avocado Demand: Deforestation and Violence in Mexico

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María Alejandra Trujillo
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The Dark Side of Avocado Demand: Deforestation and Violence in Mexico

The insatiable appetite for avocados in the United States is fueling a surge of illegal deforestation and violence in the state of Michoacan, Mexico. This high demand for avocados has resulted in the replacement of native forests with avocado orchards, leading to significant environmental consequences, such as the loss of biodiversity and the depletion of aquifers. The avocado trade, valued at $2.7 billion annually between the two countries, is also accompanied by a stark rise in violence, with criminal gangs, landowners, local officials, and community leaders engaging in threats, abductions, and killings.

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The Environmental and Human Cost of Avocado Demand

Illegal deforestation for the cultivation of avocado crops often starts with armed men arriving in trucks, followed by fires that clear vast forests of pines and oaks. Over the past decade, the United States' demand for avocados has led to the destruction of up to 70,000 acres of Mexican forests. The large-scale production of avocados, which requires substantial water, has further exacerbated environmental damage and conflicts in regions already destabilized by drug cartel turf wars.

Government Inaction and Local Resistance

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Despite both Mexico and the United States signing a United Nations agreement to halt and reverse deforestation by 2030, the trade continues to blossom unabated. Mexican environmental officials have repeatedly called on the US to prevent avocados grown on deforested lands from entering the American market, yet US officials have taken no significant action. This lack of intervention is further compounded by local corruption, with major forest loss persisting unabated and those fighting deforestation becoming targets of intimidation, abductions, and shootings.

The Avocado Industry: Acknowledgement but Little Action

The powerful association representing the Mexican avocado industry acknowledges deforestation as a problem but claims that efforts are being made to address it. However, these assertions seem to stand in stark contrast to on-the-ground realities. The illegal seizure of privately owned land for avocado orchards continues, often fueled by criminal gangs, landowners, corrupt officials, and community leaders. This relentless pursuit of profits, combined with governmental inaction, continues to threaten both the environment and the lives of those brave enough to oppose this destructive trend.

In conclusion, the high demand for avocados in the United States has led to a surge of illegal deforestation and violence in Mexico, with profound environmental and human costs. The responsibility for addressing this crisis lies not only with the governments of both nations and the avocado industry but also with consumers, who must be made aware of the true cost of their avocado consumption.

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