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Public Transport Stations: Temporary Refuge Amid Honduran Migration Crisis

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BNN Correspondents
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Public Transport Stations: Temporary Refuge Amid Honduran Migration Crisis

In a testament to the depth of the ongoing migration crisis in Central America, hundreds of migrants in Honduras have found temporary refuge in public transportation stations. The sight of families and individuals seeking better fortunes or asylum from violence and poverty in their home countries paints a stark image of the struggle that migration entails. The situation underscores wider problems of insufficient housing and support for migrants, while also potentially causing operational difficulties for the transportation system and conflicts with local commuters.

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The Journey Begins

The morning at Las Manos, one of Honduras' border crossings with Nicaragua, sees hundreds of migrants disembarking from buses and trudging along a narrow dirt road into Honduras. They are greeted by representatives from Claro, a cell phone service provider, offering prepaid cell phones and internet cards - essential tools for migrants to keep their families informed or contact coyotes, the migrant smugglers guiding them on their journey. From here, for a small fee, more buses transport them to the migrant center between the towns of Danlí and El Paraíso. This is the first stop on their long journey to the United States.

Harsh Realities of Migrant Journeys

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The journey is fraught with hardships, especially in areas like the Darién jungle on the border between Colombia and Panama. Here, migrants are exposed to accidents, robberies, and sexual assault. In the Darién Gap, Alejandro, a Venezuelan boy suffering from cerebral palsy, was carried by his younger brother, Jesús, through the rainforest. The International Organization for Migration (IOM) has warned of an unprecedented wave of people transiting through this region. This year, nearly 500,000 people have crossed the dense Darién rainforest, double the previous year's figure.

Travails at the Border

At the Las Manos border crossing, migrants from various countries including Africa and Asia are seen. Jazmie Ouchi, a 38-year-old Angolan woman, is one such migrant. However, the journey is not smooth for everyone. A Venezuelan boy and a Bangladeshi man were stopped and accused of being coyotes. While abuses by the authorities are common at the border, Venezuelans who have nothing of value are often allowed to continue their journey.

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The Wait in Matamoros

In Matamoros, Mexico, more than 2,000 migrants wait for their chance to enter the United States through a phone app known as CBP One. The process can be frustrating, with appointments randomly assigned and long waiting times. These waits have prompted many migrants to attempt irregular crossings into the United States. However, the rising instances of kidnapping have made migrants fearful of leaving the shelters. Jesuit Father Brian Strassburger, who ministers to the migrant population, encourages them to 'wait well' while taking advantage of resources available.

As the situation unfolds, the migrants' perseverance in the face of adversity serves as a stark reminder of the human element at the heart of this crisis. Their journey, while fraught with hardship and uncertainty, is a testament to their unwavering hope for a better future.

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