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Milk Price Hike: Distributors Gain While Dairy Farmers Suffer, Says FNH

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Mahnoor Jehangir
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Milk Price Hike: Distributors Gain While Dairy Farmers Suffer, Says FNH

As the world witnesses an unprecedented surge in milk prices, the Fondation pour la Nature et l'Homme (FNH) has shed light on a disconcerting trend. The price hike, rather than benefiting the hardworking dairy farmers, has become a windfall for the distributors. The FNH's report questions the fairness of this revenue distribution scheme and its impact on the livelihoods of those at the grassroots level of the dairy industry.

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Surging Prices: A Boon for Distributors

According to the FNH, the price increase at the consumer level has not translated into an equitable distribution of income along the supply chain. While the cost of milk has risen significantly, the dairy farmers – who form the backbone of the industry and are at the beginning of the supply chain – have seen only a marginal increase in their income from milk sales. On the other hand, the distributors, situated at the end of the chain, have reaped a larger share of the price hike's benefits.

Current Pricing System: A Threat to Sustainability?

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The FNH argues that the existing pricing model does not adequately support the farmers responsible for producing the milk. This discrepancy in revenue distribution, they warn, could lead to long-term sustainability issues for the dairy industry. The farmers, burdened by increasing costs and slim profit margins, may struggle to maintain their operations, potentially leading to a supply crisis in the future.

Changes on the Horizon

In response to the FNH's concerns and the rising costs burdening dairy farmers, the US Department of Agriculture is considering changes to the Federal Milk Marketing Order system. This system, which categorizes milk into one of four classes based on the dairy products it contributes to, aims to ensure that manufacturers' payment reflects the market value of the final products. The current Class I differentials, established in 1998, are under review for an update, as numerous factors have changed, leading to disorderly marketing of milk.

As the world awaits a potential overhaul of the pricing system, the question remains: Will the proposed changes ensure a more equitable distribution of the benefits of rising milk prices, or will the dairy farmers continue to bear the brunt of the system's shortcomings? Only time will tell.

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