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Climate Change Fuelling Malaria Surge Globally, WHO Report Highlights

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BNN Correspondents
New Update
Climate Change Fuelling Malaria Surge Globally, WHO Report Highlights

The World Health Organization's (WHO) 2023 World Malaria Report has underscored climate change as a major catalyst in the surge of malaria infections worldwide. Despite continuous initiatives to broaden the reach of vaccines, medications, and insecticide-treated nets, the prevalence of malaria in 2022 surpassed the pre-pandemic level by a staggering 16 million cases. The report has highlighted the role of extreme weather conditions, notably heatwaves and floods, in potentially driving the escalation of malaria cases.

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Climate Change and Malaria: A Dangerous Nexus

Changes in temperature, humidity, and rainfall patterns significantly influence the activity and survival of Anopheles mosquitoes, the primary vectors for the transmission of the malaria parasite. Extreme weather events, such as heatwaves and floods, have a direct impact on malaria transmission. Catastrophic flooding in Pakistan in 2022, for instance, resulted in a five-fold uptick in the country's malaria cases. These findings offer a clear demonstration of the intricate link between climate change and the resurgence of malaria.

A Growing Funding Gap in Malaria Response

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The World Malaria Report also shed light on the expanding funding gap in the global malaria response. This challenge threatens to undermine the strides made in combating the disease, including the phased roll-out of the first WHO-recommended malaria vaccine, RTS,S/AS01, in three African countries.

Efforts to Combat Malaria Amid Climate Change

Despite the daunting challenges, global health authorities have been forging ahead with initiatives aimed at curbing the malaria menace. One such endeavour is a ten-day program launched in Suriname by the PAHO Country Office and the National Malaria Program of the Ministry of Health. The initiative focuses primarily on enhancing the capacity for rapid malaria diagnosis and treatment in remote gold mining areas and other high-mobility communities in Suriname. These efforts underscore the urgent need for enhanced strategies to battle malaria in the face of changing environmental conditions.

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