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Nova Scotia Gears Up for First Significant Snowfall of the Season

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Sakchi Khandelwal
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Nova Scotia Gears Up for First Significant Snowfall of the Season

Nova Scotia's tranquil winter landscape is on the brink of transformation, as it braces for its first significant snowfall of the season. Environment Canada, the national weather agency, has forecasted the snowy event to commence on Sunday night, stretching into Monday night.

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With a special weather statement issued on Saturday, the agency has cautioned residents to gear up for a total snow accumulation hovering between 10 to 20 centimeters, and potentially even higher in certain areas. The impending snowfall is attributed to a low pressure system poised to drift south of the province.

Invoking memories of similar storms from the past, the impending weather event is likely to disrupt routine life with hazardous driving conditions, school closures, and cancellations of scheduled activities.

Forecasts predict the heaviest snowfall over higher terrain, with an expected 10 to 15 centimeters of snow blanketing most of Nova Scotia and southern New Brunswick by Monday evening. However, temperatures are likely to remain above the freezing mark, resulting in a wetter and slushy snow with some rain mixing in.

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Regional Weather Disparity

While the majority of Nova Scotia is steeling itself for a snow-laden landscape, the extreme southwestern parts of the province may escape the brunt of the storm. This region is anticipated to receive less snowfall, with precipitation likely to fall as rain instead. Such regional disparity in weather conditions is a common phenomenon in meteorology, influenced by a variety of factors including geographical location, topography, and atmospheric conditions.

Amidst the weather event, CBC, Canada's public broadcaster, has reiterated its commitment to making its products, including weather updates, accessible to all Canadians, irrespective of any visual, hearing, motor, or cognitive challenges they may face.

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