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Cambodia Ditches Coal Power Project for Cleaner Gas-Fired Plant

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Rafia Tasleem
New Update
Cambodia Ditches Coal Power Project for Cleaner Gas-Fired Plant

In a significant shift towards cleaner energy sources, Cambodia has scrapped a previously planned $1.5 billion 700 megawatt (MW) coal-fired power project. The Southeast Asian nation has instead chosen to focus on the construction of an 800 MW natural-gas fired power plant. This pivot not only makes Cambodia a new import market for liquefied natural gas (LNG) in the region but also reflects the escalating global trend of reducing carbon emissions.

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Transition to Greener Energy

With the cancellation of the Botum Sakor coal power project, the country's energy policy takes a decisive turn. The only remaining coal power project under development in Cambodia is now a long-delayed, small-scale 265 MW unit in the northern Oddar Meanchey province. The new gas-fired plant is expected to help Cambodia meet its energy demands while minimizing its environmental footprint.

This transition underscores the country's commitment to sustainable development. It aligns with Cambodia's goal to lift its share of clean generation capacity to 70% by 2030, demonstrating a tangible commitment to reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

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Aligning with Global Climate Goals

More than a domestic policy shift, Cambodia's decision carries international implications. It sends a strong signal to COP28, the forthcoming United Nations annual climate conference. As nations around the globe grapple with the existential threat of climate change, such policy shifts play a crucial role in charting a sustainable path forward.

The goals of the Paris Agreement and the urgency to limit temperature rise to 1.5°C underline the significance of this decision. As extreme weather events become more frequent and certain countries more vulnerable due to climate change, the move towards cleaner energy sources is not a mere option but an imperative.

Setting a Precedent

Cambodia's decision could potentially set a precedent for other developing nations grappling with similar energy challenges. It underscores the need for a global shift away from coal, a major contributor to climate change, towards more sustainable and cleaner energy options. As the world collectively strives to mitigate the impacts of global warming, Cambodia's move serves as a robust testament to the power of sustainable development and international collaboration.

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