Advertisment

Australian Study Sheds Light on Avoiding Radiotherapy in Early-Stage Breast Cancer

author-image
Geeta Pillai
New Update
Australian Study Sheds Light on Avoiding Radiotherapy in Early-Stage Breast Cancer

A breakthrough Australian study has charted a significant shift in the treatment of early-stage breast cancer, identifying women who can safely bypass radiotherapy and its frequently debilitating side effects. The research, spearheaded by Breast Cancer Trials, the largest independent clinical trials group in Australia, made use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to screen women for potential additional cancers or precancers in the breast.

Advertisment

Unveiling of a New Approach

Conducted between 2011 and 2019, the study involved 443 patients from prestigious institutions such as the Royal Melbourne Hospital, the Royal Women’s Hospital, the Austin Hospital, and the Mater Hospital in Sydney. The MRI screenings revealed additional cancers or precancerous areas in 11% of patients, necessitating radiotherapy. Furthermore, 110 patients required radiotherapy post-surgery due to the size of their cancer or lymph node spread.

This screening allowed the identification of a low-risk group of 201 patients who were treated with surgery and hormone-blocking tablets, steering clear of radiotherapy. These patients reported a diminished fear of cancer recurrence and an improved quality of life in comparison with those who underwent radiotherapy.

Advertisment

Implications of the Study

Published in The Lancet, the study emphasizes that MRI can effectively screen lower risk breast cancer patients, drastically reducing the rate of unnecessary treatments and mastectomies. It also underscores the cost-effectiveness of this approach, offering substantial savings to the health system.

A mere 1% of the patients experienced local recurrence five years post their treatment without radiotherapy, demonstrating the approach's efficacy. This novel approach challenges the prevailing reluctance to use MRI for lower risk patients and postulates a future shift towards de-escalating cancer treatments to enhance patient quality of life.

Advertisment

Shaping the Future of Breast Cancer Treatment

The findings of this study will be presented at the 2023 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium (SABCS). They offer a fresh perspective on the possibilities of employing MRI in the diagnosis and staging of breast cancer, particularly triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). In addition, the study deepens the understanding of CAIX, a potential therapeutic target in this patient population with a significant unmet medical need.

The study's results, highlighting no significant differences in progression-free survival and overall survival when palbociclib was paired with either letrozole or fulvestrant, further enrich the discourse on treatment modalities. These findings indicate a median progression-free survival of 33.2 months and a median overall survival of 65.4 months.

The groundbreaking study represents a paradigm shift in breast cancer treatment, advocating for the de-escalation of treatments and the prioritization of patient quality of life, whilst maintaining treatment efficacy.

Advertisment
Advertisment