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Bolivia's New Foreign Minister Celinda Sosa's Diplomatic Challenge: Argentina's Presidential Inauguration

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BNN Correspondents
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Bolivia's New Foreign Minister Celinda Sosa's Diplomatic Challenge: Argentina's Presidential Inauguration

In a significant development, Bolivia's new Foreign Minister, Celinda Sosa, will attend the inauguration of Argentina's president-elect, Javier Milei, on December 10th. This engagement is seen as Sosa's first major diplomatic challenge, tasked with preserving and bolstering the bilateral ties between Bolivia and Argentina.

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Strengthening Bilateral Relations

Deputy Gustavo Aliaga, a seasoned diplomat, underscored the significance of this event. He pointed out the importance of the relationship between the two countries, highlighting areas such as gas sales, banana exports, and cooperation in countering drug trafficking and smuggling. Sosa's attendance at the inauguration is seen as a crucial step toward maintaining these established connections and fostering further collaboration.

Sosa's Appointment and Role

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Celinda Sosa, who served as a minister under Evo Morales, is the second woman in Bolivia's history to hold the Foreign Minister position, succeeding Karen Longaric. Despite her inexperience in diplomacy, her appointment has been applauded for her dedication to social organizations and the anti-imperialist approach of the Movement for Socialism (MAS). Aliaga also emphasized the importance of prioritizing national interests above party politics for government officials.

Regional Diplomatic Gestures

In related regional news, Diana Mondino, Argentina's incoming Foreign Minister under Milei, has extended an invitation to Brazil's President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva to attend Milei's inauguration. This gesture emphasizes the significance of the event in reinforcing unity among Latin America's two largest countries.

EU-Mercosur Trade Deal

Meanwhile, the European Union and the Latin American trade alliance Mercosur are working towards concluding their protracted trade deal by early December. The EU's interest in this Free Trade Agreement is driven by South America's copious natural resources, making it a prime target for resource-seeking European firms. Yet, the agreement has been held back by countries with substantial agricultural concerns, who have been pushing for an additional agreement on rainforest protection.

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