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US Army's Quest for Advanced Long-Range Precision Munitions: A New Era of Military Capabilities

The US Army is poised to choose a long-range precision munition for its Apache fleet, focusing on survivability, threat adaptation, and technological advancements like Model-Based System Engineering and autonomous flight termination units.

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Shivani Chauhan
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US Army's Quest for Advanced Long-Range Precision Munitions: A New Era of Military Capabilities

US Army's Quest for Advanced Long-Range Precision Munitions: A New Era of Military Capabilities

The US Army is poised to make critical decisions on the future of its Apache fleet's long-range precision munitions. As I delve into the intricacies of this evolving landscape, it becomes clear that the stakes are high, and the implications far-reaching.

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A Shift in Strategy: From Interim to Long-Term

The Army is currently acquiring the Spike Non-Line-Of-Sight (NLOS) missile system as an interim solution. This decision comes as part of a broader strategy to fortify its Apache helicopters with advanced precision munitions. However, the Army's sights are set on a longer-term goal: a follow-on acquisition program for even more potent, long-range weapons.

The Road to Procurement: A March Deadline and a Fiscal Year 2027 Target

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The Army Requirements Oversight Council is expected to meet by the end of March to discuss the formal program of record. If all goes according to plan, potential procurement could be on the horizon as early as Fiscal Year 2027. This timeline underscores the urgency and importance of the Army's mission to equip its Apache fleet with cutting-edge munitions.

Improving Survivability and Adapting to Changing Threats

The long-range precision munition initiative is designed to enhance survivability in combat environments and adapt to evolving threats. Lockheed Martin has successfully test-fired eight Spike NLOS rounds from an AH-64E Apache V6, demonstrating the potential for equipping the current Apache platforms with this powerful system.

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However, it's worth noting that the development of Spike NLOS during this interim period will not factor into the final decision on the formal program of record. This competitive approach ensures that the Army will select the most advanced and effective system available.

A New Era of Military Acquisition: Model-Based System Engineering and Digital Mission Engineering

As the US Army moves forward with its acquisition program, it's embracing new tools and methodologies. Model-Based System Engineering (MBSE) and digital mission engineering are increasingly being adopted, providing opportunities for the safety and instrumentation industry to leverage their benefits and shorten qualification cycles.

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MBSE offers an abstraction of specification and design features, allowing for simulations of system interactions. In the context of missile and space launch flight safety and instrumentation systems, this can be particularly useful given their highly regulated and complex nature.

Autonomous decision-making and machine learning are also coming into play, enabling the dynamic generation and validation of rule parameters for autonomous flight termination. As the traditional method of flight termination, conducted by a person monitoring real-time telemetry, is phased out in some cases, autonomous flight termination units (AFTUs) are stepping in to make determinations based on a set of rules.

MBSE and machine learning can help adapt these rules to different test conditions and locations, increasing the reliability of flight safety systems. As the Army forges ahead with its long-range precision munition acquisition program, it's clear that these technological advancements will play a crucial role in shaping the future of military capabilities.

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