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Ocean Acidification Threatens Red Abalone: Study Reveals Lasting Impacts

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Hadeel Hashem
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Ocean Acidification Threatens Red Abalone: Study Reveals Lasting Impacts

Researchers at the University of California, Davis have discovered that the negative effects of ocean acidification, a result of escalating carbon dioxide emissions, have a lasting impact on the red abalone, a species endemic to California and currently listed as critically endangered. The study, published in Global Change Biology, demonstrates how both early-life and adult exposure to heightened acidity levels can significantly stunt growth and reproductive potential in red abalone, with these effects seeping into subsequent generations.

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Implications of Ocean Acidification

Ocean acidification poses a grave threat to many marine organisms, particularly those relying on calcium carbonate shells or skeletons, like corals, oysters, and abalones. The acidic conditions corrode these structures and impede the creatures' ability to rebuild them, drastically reducing their survival odds. The red abalone, a marine snail species found along California's coasts, is particularly susceptible to these conditions.

Uncovering the Impact on Red Abalone

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In the study, the researchers exposed red abalone larvae to various acidity levels under controlled laboratory conditions. The results were stark: high acidity led to significant stress for the red abalone populations, threatening their survival and overall ecosystem health. Early-life exposure proved particularly harmful, with young abalone showing decreased growth and reproductive potential that carried over into their adult lives and subsequent generations.

The Cultural and Conservation Significance

The findings hold particular relevance for California's coastal Native people, for whom the red abalone holds cultural significance. Furthermore, the study's insights contribute to understanding the challenges faced by red abalone and the potential strategies for aiding their recovery in the wild. Strategic buffering of water chemistry at key life stages, for example, could benefit captive and commercial abalone cultivation. More broadly, these findings form part of ongoing conservation efforts for the species, currently threatened by habitat degradation, climate change, and other factors such as overpopulation of sea urchins and declining kelp forests.

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