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Victoria Villarruel's Vice Presidency Sparks Concerns Over Historical Revisionism

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BNN Correspondents
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Victoria Villarruel's Vice Presidency Sparks Concerns Over Historical Revisionism

Victoria Villarruel, an attorney known for her involvement with organizations that have attempted to justify the actions of Argentina's last dictatorship, has assumed the role of vice president. Her association with the party the Freedom Advance (LLA), however, seems to have diminished her influence, particularly over the Ministries of Security and Defense. Human rights organizations, including Estela de Carlotto, president of the Abuelas de Plaza de Mayo, are expressing concern over potential promotion of a denialist agenda by Villarruel.

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Victoria Villarruel's Controversial Associations

Villarruel's affiliations with several organizations that endorse or justify actions taken during the last dictatorship are a cause of significant concern. She is the leader of the Center for Legal Studies on Terrorism and its Victims (Celtyv), an organization focused on prosecuting militants from the 1970s. These associations raise questions about her potential influence on the established history of the last 40 years of Argentine democracy and important elements such as the 'Nunca Más' report and the Trial of the Juntas.

Power Struggle Within the Freedom Advance

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Despite Villarruel's claims during her campaign that she would have a say in the appointment of the ministers of Security and Defense, her running mate Javier Milei decided to favor his alliance with Patricia Bullrich. As a result of this political maneuvering, Villarruel's role within the LLA block is now uncertain. Her influence seems to have lessened, and she has seemingly lost the opportunity to place trusted individuals in key positions such as the Federal Intelligence Agency.

Implications for Human Rights in Argentina

As Villarruel assumes her role as vice president and focuses on her responsibilities in the Senate, human rights activists remain wary. They are closely monitoring whether her reduced role in decision-making could provide her with more time to pursue her agenda of 'complete memory.' This includes challenging court cases related to the dictatorship era, a move that could potentially rewrite the narrative of human rights violations and justice in Argentina.

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