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The 100 Year Canister Life Act: Doubling Nuclear Waste Storage Safety

U.S. Representative Mike Levin has reintroduced the '100 Year Canister Life Act' to increase the safety of nuclear waste storage systems. The Act seeks to mandate that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission only approves storage systems capable of safely containing nuclear waste for a full century. With over 3.5 million pounds of nuclear waste stored in California, and around 90,000 metric tons nationwide, the Act aims to address the urgent need for robust storage solutions and ensure safety for communities and the environment.

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Mazhar Abbas
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The 100 Year Canister Life Act: Doubling Nuclear Waste Storage Safety

The 100 Year Canister Life Act: Doubling Nuclear Waste Storage Safety

In a bid to address the longstanding issue of nuclear waste storage, U.S. Representative Mike Levin has reintroduced the "100 Year Canister Life Act." This legislation seeks to mandate that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission only approves storage systems capable of safely containing nuclear waste for a full century, effectively doubling the current lifespan requirements for temporary storage systems.

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A Century of Safety: The 100 Year Canister Life Act

With over 3.5 million pounds of nuclear waste stored at San Onofre in California, and around 90,000 metric tons nationwide, the urgency for a robust storage solution is palpable. This figure is projected to rise by an additional 50,000 metric tons by 2060. However, the Department of Energy (DOE) has faced criticism for its slow progress in finding a permanent waste disposal solution. The failed Yucca Mountain project in Nevada stands as a testament to these challenges.

Despite the federal Nuclear Waste Fund, which currently holds nearly $48 billion for a permanent solution, skeptics remain wary due to past delays. The DOE has initiated a consent-based siting program, which could potentially move the waste from San Onofre in about 15 years. However, environmental concerns, such as erosion at the bluffs where the waste is stored, underscore the urgency of the situation.

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Raising the Bar for On-Site Storage

The 100 Year Canister Life Act, co-sponsored by Rep. Salud O. Carbajal, aims to raise the design standards on waste canisters for spent nuclear fuel from 40 years to 100 years. This move is intended to ensure the safe storage of spent nuclear fuel until a long-term disposal solution is found.

"This bill is about raising standards for on-site storage to increase community safety and confidence," said Rep. Carbajal. "We need to do everything we can to protect our communities and our environment while we work towards a long-term solution for nuclear waste storage."

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Support from Southern California Edison

Southern California Edison, the operator of San Onofre, supports the bill and remains committed to safe storage and eventual off-site disposal of the nuclear waste. "We believe that the 100 Year Canister Life Act will help ensure the safety and security of nuclear waste storage," said a spokesperson for the company.

As the debate around nuclear waste disposal continues, the introduction of the 100 Year Canister Life Act marks a significant step towards addressing the safety concerns associated with stranded commercial spent fuel. The bill, if passed, could set a new standard for nuclear waste storage, providing a safer and more sustainable solution for future generations.

In the face of escalating environmental concerns and the pressing need for long-term nuclear waste disposal, the 100 Year Canister Life Act serves as a beacon of hope. By extending the lifespan of temporary storage systems, this bill aims to buy time, ensuring the safety and security of communities living in the shadow of nuclear waste.

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