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'Second Ukraine' Movement Registers Branch in Serbia

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Salman Akhtar
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'Second Ukraine' Movement Registers Branch in Serbia

The 'Second Ukraine' movement, founded by Ukrainian oligarch and pro-Russian politician Viktor Medvedchuk, has registered a branch in Serbia. The Serbian branch was established two months ago, as confirmed by Dejan Stanojevic, a Serbian businessman from Ukraine, and representative of the association in Serbia. The Second Ukraine is officially recorded in the Serbian Business Registers Agency (APR).

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Stanojevic and the Second Ukraine

Stanojevic became the representative of Second Ukraine due to his connections established during his stay in Ukraine. However, he clarifies that the complete organization belongs to Medvedchuk and other Ukrainian journalists, political scientists, and activists. The society's aim is to integrate Ukrainians in Serbia who hold different views from the official position and to assist them as needed. Stanojevic emphasizes that this is a social effort, not a political one, and the intention is to help all Ukrainians in Serbia regardless of their political ideology.

Medvedchuk's Ties and Wealth

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Despite Medvedchuk's close ties to Putin, Stanojevic believes there is nothing negative about this and compares it to other political relationships, pointing out that Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky is also someone's godfather. Medvedchuk was exchanged by Kyiv to Moscow for captured Azov battalion fighters last year. He is one of Ukraine's richest individuals, with Forbes estimating his wealth at $620 million. Medvedchuk is known for his yacht in Croatia and his connections with Putin, which began when he served as the head of the Ukrainian presidential administration.

Medvedchuk's Controversies

He is subject to U.S. sanctions following Russia's annexation of Crimea in 2014 and was arrested by Ukraine last year for treason and the looting of state resources in Crimea. His decision to establish a branch of his organization in Serbia marks a new chapter in his controversial career and raises questions about the future political landscape in the region.

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