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Mojib Latif Challenges 1.5-Degree Target Fixation in Climate Policy

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Wojciech Zylm
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Mojib Latif Challenges 1.5-Degree Target Fixation in Climate Policy

In a recent episode of '#BerichtausBerlinExtra', distinguished climate researcher Mojib Latif shared a perspective that challenges the popular narrative in climate policy. Latif criticized the singular focus on the 1.5-degree target, suggesting that this hardline approach may be misdirected. The discussion underscored an ongoing debate within the climate science community and political circles about the most effective strategies for tackling climate change, and the feasibility of certain targets.

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Reality Check for Climate Goals

Leading scientists worldwide delivered a sobering message to the United Nations, stating that it's becoming increasingly likely that countries will fail to meet the ambitious target set eight years ago for limiting global warming. The grim estimate indicates a growing probability that global warming will exceed 1.5 degrees Celsius before the century's end. This overshoot in temperature is predicted to have devastating effects, intensifying storms, drought, and heat, exacting a heavy toll on human lives and economies.

The 1.5-Degree Debate

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The current national climate action plans appear insufficient to limit global temperature rise to 1.5 degrees Celsius and fulfill the goals of the Paris Agreement. This reality has sparked a discussion about whether the 1.5-degree target is realistic or if it overshadows other important aspects of climate policy. Mojib Latif believes that a more nuanced approach may be necessary, emphasizing the need for a realistic assessment of climate goals and the actions needed to attain them.

Climate Crisis: A Global Emergency

As global leaders and delegates gather in Dubai for the annual UN climate summit, a new analysis reveals how the host cities of previous summits could be inundated, if not entirely submerged, by rising ocean waters. This year, with 2023 projected to be the hottest on record, the World Meteorological Organisation estimates that global warming will reach 1.4 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels. As another year of floods, droughts, and forest fires draws to a close, the question arises: Will things change in the coming years?

The COP28 climate conference in Dubai presents a pivotal moment as world leaders grapple with pressing climate challenges. The conference is focused on fossil fuels, funding disparities, and deforestation, seeking concrete actions to mitigate the escalating climate crisis and prioritize environmental sustainability.

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