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Jordanian Official Warns Against Ongoing Conflict: U.S. Veto Deepens International Fracture

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Safak Costu
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Jordanian Official Warns Against Ongoing Conflict: U.S. Veto Deepens International Fracture

In a recent public statement, the Jordanian Foreign Minister offered a stern warning about the ongoing conflict involving Israel. His assertion that the war will not bring peace and security to Israel, but will instead lead to further wars and destruction, underscores the trepidation about the potential for the situation to escalate further. This perspective reflects broader concerns about the increasing instability and suffering in the region.

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The U.S. Veto and International Fracture

The United States recently vetoed a United Nations resolution demanding an immediate humanitarian ceasefire in Gaza. Backed by almost all other Security Council members and dozens of nations, the resolution had garnered nearly 100 co-sponsors in less than 24 hours. The U.S. opposition to the ceasefire, citing support for a durable peace but not for immediate cessation of hostilities, deepens the fracture between Washington and some of its closest allies over Israel's protracted bombardment of Gaza.

Humanitarian Catastrophe and the Call for Ceasefire

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The resolution highlighted the humanitarian catastrophe in Gaza, with intense and widespread Israeli attacks causing significant destruction and displacement. The U.N. Secretary-General warned of a high risk of the total collapse of the humanitarian support system in Gaza, leading to a complete breakdown of public order and increased pressure for mass displacement into Egypt. Despite the renewed push for a ceasefire, both the U.S. and Israel oppose it, believing it would only benefit Hamas. However, Washington supports pauses in fighting to protect civilians and allow the release of hostages taken by Hamas.

U.S. Diplomatic Isolation

The U.S. veto has diplomatically isolated Washington as it shields its ally, Israel. The United States opposes a ceasefire, citing its support for a durable peace but not for an immediate cease fire. The U.S. favors its own diplomacy rather than Security Council action to win the release of more hostages and press Israel to better protect civilians in Gaza as it retaliates for the Hamas attack that Israel says killed 1,200 people. This policy has drawn criticism and deepened the divide between the U.S. and other global players.

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