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Fact-Checking Center Debunks Dual Citizenship Rumors about Taiwanese Vice-Presidential Candidates

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Rafia Tasleem
New Update
Fact-Checking Center Debunks Dual Citizenship Rumors about Taiwanese Vice-Presidential Candidates

In a recent effort to combat misinformation, The Fact-Checking Center has released a definitive report addressing rumors that Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) vice-presidential candidate Hsiao Bi-khim had not renounced her U.S. citizenship and was running for vice president without a Taiwanese ID card. These rumors, which began circulating online on December 1st, were accompanied by a dated news report from China Television News Network from November 30, 2000, discussing Hsiao's citizenship status while she was serving as a presidential advisor.

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Unraveling the Truth

The Fact-Checking Center has clarified that Hsiao renounced her U.S. citizenship in 2002. This is confirmed by a list published on the U.S. Federal Register's website on July 22, 2002, showing 'Hsiao Bi-Khim' with the middle name Louise. Furthermore, media reports from March 14, 2002, indicate that Hsiao took the oath of office as a legislator and obtained her ID card at that time, having applied to renounce her U.S. citizenship via the American Institute in Taiwan. Thus, the rumors suggesting she held dual citizenship have been labeled as 'false'.

Dual Citizenship Controversy

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Interestingly, Hsiao is not the only political figure to face questions about dual citizenship. People's Party vice-presidential candidate Cynthia Wu (Wu Hsin-ying) also faced a similar controversy. The party spokesperson refuted these claims, stating that Wu had renounced her U.S. citizenship. This statement is seemingly supported by a Federal Register entry on April 23, 2014, showing a 'Cynthia Wu' renouncing U.S. citizenship, although no Chinese name phonetics were provided.

Implications on Taiwan's Political Landscape

The recent clarification from the Fact-Checking Center not only refutes misinformation, but also reinforces the integrity of Taiwan's political landscape. It underscores the importance of fact-checking in maintaining an informed electorate and protecting the democratic process from the potential damaging effects of misinformation. It also highlights the value of transparency in a candidate's personal history, particularly regarding issues like citizenship that have direct implications on their eligibility and suitability for public office.

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