Advertisment

Elgin Marbles Controversy Intensifies as U.K. PM Sunak Cancels Meeting with Greek Counterpart

author-image
Safak Costu
New Update
Elgin Marbles Controversy Intensifies as U.K. PM Sunak Cancels Meeting with Greek Counterpart

U.K. Prime Minister Rishi Sunak recently canceled a scheduled meeting with Greek Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis, adding another layer of complexity to the ongoing debate about the Parthenon Sculptures, also known as the Elgin Marbles. The artifacts, dating back to the 5th Century BCE, are currently housed in the British Museum. However, their ownership is a contentious issue, with critics, including Mitsotakis, arguing that they were stolen and should be returned to Greece.

Advertisment

Controversy over the Elgin Marbles

The Elgin Marbles were acquired by the British Museum in 1816 from Lord Elgin and have become a symbol of the broader issue of repatriating cultural treasures. Mitsotakis, the leader of Greece's New Democracy party, has been vocal about his desire to see the marbles returned to Greece. He likens their division to splitting the Mona Lisa in half, stating that their appreciation is diminished by their separation from their original context.

The Cancellation and its Aftermath

Advertisment

Sunak's abrupt cancellation of the meeting with Mitsotakis has been interpreted as a response to the Greek Prime Minister's comments about the Elgin Marbles. However, despite the snub from Sunak, Mitsotakis was able to meet with Labour Party Leader Keir Starmer, who has indicated a willingness to lend the marbles to Athens should the Labour party come into power.

Debate Over Repatriation of Cultural Treasures

The controversy surrounding the Elgin Marbles highlights the broader debate over repatriating cultural treasures. The U.K., a former colonial power, holds various artifacts acquired during its colonial era, and many of these items, such as the 'Koh-i-noor' diamond, are claimed by their countries of origin. The recent incident involving Sunak and Mitsotakis serves as a stark reminder of the complexities involved in addressing these claims and the diplomacy required to navigate them.

Advertisment
Advertisment