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Supreme Court Judge Eschews Fine for Hotel Supervisor Amid Corruption Trial

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Wojciech Zylm
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Supreme Court Judge Eschews Fine for Hotel Supervisor Amid Corruption Trial

In a significant development in Nassau, during the corruption trial of Adrian Gibson, Supreme Court Judge Cheryl Grant-Thompson chose not to impose a fine on an Atlantis hotel supervisor, Stevette Moncur, despite a breach of juror-employer conduct. The incident was brought to light following a complaint by a juror who claimed that Moncur had instructed her to utilize her vacation leave while serving on jury duty.

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Alleged Breach of Conduct

Moncur, who holds the position of a concierge manager at Atlantis, defended herself, stating that it was a misunderstanding. She elaborated that she had merely suggested the juror use her vacation leave before the hotel's impending blackout period. However, Justice Grant-Thompson held that such a suggestion could potentially make a juror feel uneasy, emphasizing that serving on a jury is not a choice but a mandatory civic duty.

A Stern Warning Instead of a Fine

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Although the judge could have imposed up to a $2,000 fine on Moncur or initiated contempt charges, she decided against it. In lieu of penalties, Justice Grant-Thompson issued a stern warning, expressing her belief that this would suffice. She stressed that such instances should serve to highlight the importance of proper employer conduct during a trial, a point she was satisfied was being covered by the press in attendance.

The Corruption Trial of Adrian Gibson

The trial in question involves Adrian Gibson, who stands accused of not disclosing his interests in contracts awarded by the Water and Sewerage Corporation (WSC) to various companies. The charges leveled against Gibson and his co-accused consist of conspiracy to commit bribery, bribery, fraud, receiving, and money laundering. Taken together, these allegations total to a staggering 98 charges.

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