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New Jersey Abolishes 'So Help Me God' from Candidates' Oath Following Lawsuit

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BNN Correspondents
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New Jersey Abolishes 'So Help Me God' from Candidates' Oath Following Lawsuit

In a landmark decision that has stirred both discussions and controversies, New Jersey has abolished the obligatory inclusion of the phrase "so help me God" in the oath administered to candidates filing for office. This decisive action is an outcome of a lawsuit filed by a Democratic candidate for the Essex County Board of Commissioners, who contended that the compulsory inclusion of the religious phrase in candidacy paperwork infringed his rights as a non-religious individual.

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Lawsuit Challenges Religious Phrase

The lawsuit was directed towards the Essex County clerk's office and New Jersey's secretary of state, and it ignited a settlement that led to the elimination of the religious reference from the oath. The plaintiff, in this case, was supported by the Freedom From Religion Foundation, an organization committed to preserving the constitutional principle of the separation of church and state.

Impact on Candidates and Society

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This resolution augments an ongoing national discourse about the separation of church and state and the inclusivity of non-religious individuals in public roles. The change is anticipated to render the candidacy process more accessible to all individuals, irrespective of their religious beliefs. This aligns with the constitutional principles that prohibit religious tests for public office, a standard that has been consistently reinforced by the courts.

Opposition to the Change

However, the change has not been universally welcomed. Conservative groups have expressed their disapproval, viewing this as a part of secular efforts to diminish the influence of religion in society. Despite the backlash, the state's commitment to upholding the Constitution's 'no religious test for public office' has been emphasized.

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