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Chile's Plebiscite: A Critique, Not a Political Attack, Asserts 'Reject' Campaign Spokesperson

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BNN Correspondents
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Chile's Plebiscite: A Critique, Not a Political Attack, Asserts 'Reject' Campaign Spokesperson

The forthcoming plebiscite in Chile, scheduled for December 17th, is causing waves across the nation's political landscape. Antonia Rivas, a former commissioner and spokesperson for the 'Reject' campaign, has provided a fresh perspective on the nature of the vote. The ballot is not a critique of specific political figures or the government, Rivas emphasizes, but a rigorous examination of the proposed constitutional text.

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'Reject' Campaign: An Examination, Not an Attack

The 'Reject' campaign, Rivas clarifies, employs current events to spotlight the deficiencies of the proposed constitution, particularly in the fight against drug trafficking and corruption. Far from sowing discord or fear among the populace, the campaign's objections are technical, rooted in the text's perceived shortcomings, rather than politically divisive.

(Read Also: Chile’s Socialist Party Backs Housing Minister Amidst Scandal, Discusses Constitutional Plebiscite)

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A Narrow Outcome and Public Reception

With the result of the plebiscite potentially hanging in the balance, Rivas believes the campaign's clear stance has resonated with the public. She anticipates a shift in campaign tone from the previous 'Approve' campaign, predicting a more serious and reflective discourse. In Rivas' view, casting a vote against the proposal is a democratic responsibility, not a point of contention.

(Read Also: Chile’s Plebiscite: A Crucial Verdict on Boric’s Leadership and Constitution)

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Post-'Reject' Vote: A Shift of Focus

If the 'Reject' vote proves dominant, Rivas foresees a redirection of focus towards the Parliament. There, fundamental reforms in security, health, pensions, and education can take centre stage. She contends that, at present, there is no willingness from the officialism or the right to embark on a new constitutional process. Any decision to do so would hinge on the country's future consensus.

Rivas also acknowledges the potential utility of previous consensus-based constitutional proposals. These could serve as valuable inputs for future discussions, providing a wellspring of ideas for the path forward.

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