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Fiuto: Italy's First Restaurant for Dogs Opens in Rome

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Sakchi Khandelwal
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Fiuto's attention to detail extends beyond the menu. Portions are sized according to the dog's weight, ensuring a balanced diet.

In an intriguing confluence of culinary artistry and canine care, Rome has welcomed 'Fiuto', Italy's first restaurant meticulously designed for dogs. This unique dining experience has emerged as a testament to the evolving relationship between humans and their furry companions, offering a menu that transcends the conventional boundaries of pet food.

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A Tailor-Made Menu for Canine Palates

Ensuring a delightful and nutritious experience for canine patrons, Fiuto curates a menu that includes options like boiled eggs with pureed peas and fontina cheese, simple fish with ricotta and courgettes, and an array of fruit juices. Created with the guidance of a veterinary nutritionist, the menu caters to dogs' dietary needs and takes into account common allergies. Luca Grammatico, the head chef with a background as a dog trainer, underscores the deliberate absence of spices, salt, and oils in the canine cuisine, which is prepared in a separate kitchen.

Ensuring a Balanced Diet and Comfortable Ambiance

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Fiuto's attention to detail extends beyond the menu. Portions are sized according to the dog's weight, ensuring a balanced diet. Moreover, the atmosphere is carefully crafted to be dog-friendly, with soft lighting, lounge music, and fleece blankets for the pets. Dining from designer bowls, the dogs enjoy their meals alongside their human companions, underlining the integrated dining experience that Fiuto aims to provide.

Reception and Reflections on Pet Pampering

Fiuto's innovative approach has received a warm reception, averaging 6-10 dog guests on weekdays and 10-15 on weekends, with meal prices ranging from 8 to 20 euros. Customers like Romina Lanza have even celebrated special occasions such as their dog's birthdays at the restaurant. Co-founders, including Marco Turano, express delight at the positive reception in the Ponte Milvio district of Rome, even as they acknowledge the broader social debate on pet pampering versus global human needs. Fiuto's success paints a compelling picture of a society where pets are increasingly seen as family members, reshaping the dynamics of the human-animal bond.

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