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Behind the Bar: Drinks Bartenders Avoid Ordering Themselves

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BNN Correspondents
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Behind the Bar: Drinks Bartenders Avoid Ordering Themselves

In the bustling world of bars and cocktails, what do those who create the magic themselves prefer not to order when they sit on the other side of the bar? The answer to this question offers intriguing insights into the art and science of mixology, the environment of various establishments, and the preferences of the professionals themselves.

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Drinks to Avoid at Dive Bars

Daniel Yeom, the general manager of Esters Wine Shop & Bar, provides a warning for those frequenting dive bars. He advises against ordering wine or draft beer in these settings due to potential quality issues. These establishments may lack the necessary infrastructure to ensure the preservation of wine and the cleanliness of the draft system. Yeom recommends opting for simple drinks in such settings. Classics like a gin and tonic, whiskey and Coke, or a bottled beer are his personal choices.

The 'Juvenile' Choice

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Lauren Lenihan, a seasoned bartender with over two decades of experience, singles out the Long Island iced tea as a cocktail she avoids. With its complex mix of ingredients and a reputation associated with customers who prioritize alcohol strength over taste, the drink is deemed a 'juvenile' choice by bartenders. Lenihan’s perspective underpins the importance of balance and taste over sheer potency in a cocktail.

The Burdensome Order

Another drink that bartenders often avoid is the Ramos Gin Fizz. Famous for its labor-intensive preparation, this cocktail requires extensive shaking to emulsify its ingredients, a process that can burden bartenders during busy shifts.

The collective wisdom of bartenders underscores the importance of reading the atmosphere of a bar and making appropriate drink choices. It's not just about what you want to drink, but also about understanding the setting and the bartender's workload. This balance ensures a better experience for both the bartender and the customer, creating a harmonious exchange that forms the essence of a well-functioning bar.

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