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Harriet Tubman: The Fearless Liberator of the Civil War Era

Harriet Tubman, born a slave, became a heroine of the Civil War era by leading hundreds to freedom and conducting the Combahee River Raid. Her legacy continues to inspire.

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Harriet Tubman: The Fearless Liberator of the Civil War Era

Harriet Tubman: The Fearless Liberator of the Civil War Era

Harriet Tubman: The Unsung Heroine of the Civil War Era

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Born a slave in Maryland during 1822, Harriet Tubman would grow up to become one of the most influential figures in American history. After escaping to the North in 1849, she courageously returned to the South multiple times, leading hundreds of enslaved Africans to freedom. Her role in the Union Army during the Civil War, particularly in the Combahee River Raid, cemented her legacy as a true liberator.

The Journey to Freedom

After her own daring escape from slavery, Harriet Tubman, also known as "Moses," embarked on numerous missions back to the South to rescue fellow enslaved Africans. Utilizing the Underground Railroad, a secret network of safe houses and supporters, she guided approximately 70 slaves to freedom between 1850 and 1860.

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In 1862, Tubman found herself on Hilton Head Island, which served as the Union Headquarters in the South. Here, she spent a year providing the Union Army with valuable intelligence gathered from locals familiar with the Lowcountry waterways.

The Combahee River Raid

June 2, 1863, marks the date of Tubman's most notable achievement: the Combahee River Raid. Leading a group of 150 African-American soldiers, she guided three Union gunboats up the Combahee River in Beaufort, South Carolina. Their mission was to disrupt Confederate supply routes, destroy plantations, and free the enslaved Africans on those properties.

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The raid proved to be an overwhelming success. Over 700 enslaved Africans were rescued, and the Union soldiers destroyed millions of dollars' worth of Confederate supplies. This operation not only demonstrated the strategic importance of black soldiers and leaders in the Union Army but also highlighted Tubman's invaluable contributions to the war effort.

A Lasting Legacy

Tubman's efforts significantly influenced military policies regarding newly freed slaves. Thanks to her work, the first Freedman community in the United States was established on Hilton Head Island, built by and for black people. This community, called Mitchelville, became a beacon of hope and an example of self-sufficiency for former slaves.

As we commemorate Harriet Tubman's life and legacy, a monument is being raised at Tabernacle Baptist Church in Beaufort, South Carolina, the very place where she once sought refuge. This monument serves as a reminder of her incredible courage, resilience, and the enduring impact she had on the lives of countless African-Americans.

In a world where the lines between past and present often blur, Harriet Tubman's story remains an essential piece of the tapestry that makes up American history. Her tenacity in the face of adversity and her unwavering commitment to freedom continue to inspire generations to fight for justice and equality.

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