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Russia Considers State Ownership of Defense-Related Inventions and Patents

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BNN Correspondents
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Russia Considers State Ownership of Defense-Related Inventions and Patents

Reports have emerged that the Russian government is mulling over an initiative that could lead to the state assuming ownership of all inventions and patents developed under defense contracts. This proposal, under discussion since December 1, aims to divide inventions created via government orders into two categories: those intended for civilian use and those for military purposes. The initiative also proposes two distinct management protocols for these categories: a 'general' one for civilian patents and inventions, and a 'special' one for defense-related inventions.

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State Ownership of Defense-related Inventions

If the proposed document gains approval, all inventions and patents developed for the defense industry's needs will be transferred to the state in an expedited process. This move comes amidst a backdrop of increasing tensions between Russia and the international community, particularly the United States.

Impact on Intellectual Property Rights

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Earlier this year, the Russian government issued Decree 299, eliminating the royalty rate for national security-based compulsory licenses to intellectual property rights held by individuals or entities from the United States or other 'unfriendly' nations. This development, coupled with sanctions imposed by the international community, has raised questions about the future engagement of U.S. entities with Russian intellectual property agencies.

Looking Ahead: Wartime and Postwar Intellectual Property Rights

The ongoing Russo-Ukrainian War has raised novel questions within the intellectual property rights landscape. This article delves into the wartime and postwar protection of intellectual property rights, examining the robust structural features, safeguards, limitations, and flexibilities that the international intellectual property regime encompasses to protect rights holders during wartime. The future of intellectual property rights amid armed conflict remains a vital area of exploration, with the potential to influence innovation theory, intellectual property law, and international law.

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