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Debunking Houthi Rebels' Claim of Downing an F-22 Raptor Amid U.S. Strikes in Yemen

Houthi rebels claim to have shot down an F-22 Raptor amid U.S. strikes in Yemen, a claim widely discredited by U.S. defense officials.

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BNN Correspondents
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Debunking Houthi Rebels' Claim of Downing an F-22 Raptor Amid U.S. Strikes in Yemen

In the midst of a U.S. Navy operation that witnessed the launch of Tomahawk missiles at Houthi rebel positions in Yemen, a startling claim emerged from the Houthi militants. They asserted having shot down an F-22 Raptor, a claim that has since been widely discredited due to lack of visual evidence and firm denials from U.S. defense officials.

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The Denied Claim and the Reality

The operation, which involved the UK's Royal Air Force conducting precision strikes with Eurofighter Typhoons, did not include U.S. Air Force F-22s, thus further debunking the Houthi claim. The Houthis, a group backed by Iran and designated as a terrorist organization, have been known for targeting commercial shipping in support of Hamas.

F-22 Raptor: An Unscathed Legacy

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The F-22 Raptor, a fifth-generation air superiority fighter, has been in service for nearly two decades without a single incident of being shot down. The U.S. had previously deployed these Raptors to the Middle East as a counteraction to aggressive Russian aircraft behavior. The deployment of the F-22 demonstrates the U.S. commitment to regional stability and is a showcase of its advanced capabilities, including stealth, supercruise, agility, situational awareness, and multirole functions.

The Houthis and the Greater Yemen Conflict

The ongoing conflict in Yemen has been marked by the Houthi rebels' persistent defiance and escalation. Their bold, albeit unsubstantiated, claim of shooting down a U.S. Air Force F-22 Raptor amid U.S. strikes mirrors this defiance. Despite the denial by U.S. defense officials, the incident has raised concerns about the escalating capabilities of the Houthi rebels and the potential for further intensification of the conflict in Yemen.

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