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Winter's Chill and the Increased Risk of Heart Diseases

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BNN Correspondents
New Update
Winter's Chill and the Increased Risk of Heart Diseases

Winter, an undeniably beautiful season, is often associated with the joy of holidays, snowy landscapes, and cozy nights by the fire. But, it also brings along a spike in various health risks, particularly heart diseases. The cold weather is known to constrict blood vessels, thereby increasing blood pressure and placing an additional workload on the heart. This, when coupled with a more sedentary lifestyle and the consumption of calorie-rich foods, can lead to weight gain and a higher risk of cardiovascular issues.

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The Domino Effect of Cold Weather

During the winter months, illnesses spread more rapidly as people spend more time indoors, in close contact with others. Common cold weather ailments such as the flu, common cold, hypothermia, and respiratory infections like bronchitis and pneumonia, can exacerbate pre-existing heart conditions, especially in older individuals and those with compromised immune systems.

Moreover, shoveling snow, a seemingly innocuous activity, can put extra strain on the heart, particularly for those already living with heart disease. The psychological and physiological stressors include blood vessels constricting from the cold, leading to increased blood pressure and chest pain.

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Precautions and Protective Measures

However, the risks associated with winter are not undefeatable. There are several precautions individuals can take to protect themselves. These include staying warm, maintaining a healthy diet, and continuing to exercise. Other protective measures entail drinking plenty of water, taking regular breaks while shoveling snow, and keeping a phone handy for emergencies.

Health organizations provide valuable resources, including information on seasonal vaccinations and tips on how to keep warm. A yellow cold-health alert for the East of England, for example, has been issued due to the increased risk of health problems from cold weather.

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Understanding the Environmental Factors

Interestingly, not just the cold but other weather factors can also impact heart health. Heat waves during summer, for instance, can increase the risk of stroke and heart attacks. Moreover, exposure to higher humidity has been linked to more hospitalizations related to cardiovascular disease.

Environmental persistent free radicals (EPFRs), generated from the thermal remediation of organic waste, cause oxidative stress when inhaled, impacting lung function and vascular function. A recent study suggests that exposure to highway air pollution, particularly from particulate matter containing EPFRs, can cause a serious and sustained spike in blood pressure.

As we navigate through the winter season, it's crucial to stay aware and prepared. It is not about fearing the cold, but about understanding the potential risks and taking the necessary steps to stay safe and healthy.

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