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White Beans in Diet Can Improve Gut Health, Aiding Colorectal Cancer Prevention and Treatment

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Nasiru Eneji Abdulrasheed
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White Beans in Diet Can Improve Gut Health, Aiding Colorectal Cancer Prevention and Treatment

In a significant leap forward for cancer research, a recent American study has uncovered the potential benefits of incorporating white beans into our daily diet. Notably, the findings suggest that this simple dietary modification can improve gut health and, in turn, prevent and positively impact the treatment outcomes for colorectal cancer.

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White Beans: A Dietary Game Changer

Published in the esteemed journal eBIOMedicine, the study highlights the role of the gut microbiome in maintaining human health and immunity. The researchers discovered that adding white beans to the diet of colorectal cancer survivors modified biomarkers connected with obesity and gastrointestinal disease. This modification is significant as obesity and poor nutrition can disrupt the gut microbiome's balance, leading to inflammation and impacting survival rates for individuals who have had colorectal cancer.

Colorectal Cancer: A Global Concern

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Colorectal cancer is far from a rare occurrence. It stands as one of the most common types of cancer globally and is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths. Symptoms include diarrhea, constipation, blood in the stool, abdominal pain, and unexplained weight loss, fatigue, and low iron levels. Given its widespread impact, any advancement in prevention and treatment is noteworthy.

Study Findings & Implications

The study followed 48 men and women over the age of 30, some with a history of colorectal cancer, over an eight-week period. Half of the participants followed their usual diet while the other half added a cup of cooked white beans to their diet daily. Those who included white beans in their meals experienced positive changes in their gut microbiome, which have been linked to cancer prevention and improved treatment outcomes. These changes included an increase in the diversity of beneficial gut bacteria and a decrease in pathogenic bacteria.

Dr. Carrie Daniel-MacDougall, the study's lead researcher and an epidemiology professor at the MD Anderson Cancer Center at the University of Texas, shed light on the power of dietary modifications in inducing positive changes in the gut microbiome. She emphasized that beans are packed with gut-supporting fibers, amino acids, and other nutrients that help beneficial bacteria in the colon thrive, thus supporting immune health and regulating inflammation. Importantly, she also noted that the beans did not cause gut inflammation or significantly affect bowel habits - a crucial factor for colorectal cancer survivors and patients.

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