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Vitamin D Deficiency Linked to Higher Risk of Dementia and Stroke: Study

New research links vitamin D deficiency to an increased risk of dementia and stroke. The study suggests that maintaining adequate vitamin D levels could prevent up to 17% of dementia cases.

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Nimrah Khatoon
New Update
Vitamin D Deficiency Linked to Higher Risk of Dementia and Stroke: Study

Recent research has unveiled a significant correlation between vitamin D deficiency and an increased risk of dementia and stroke. The study, published in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, was carried out by the University of South Australia. Utilizing genetic data, the team of researchers analyzed the health information of a staggering 300,000 individuals to probe into the relationship between deficient levels of vitamin D, specifically below 25 nmol/L, and the subsequent risk of developing dementia and stroke.

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Link to Brain Health

The findings from this groundbreaking study suggest that a deficiency in vitamin D contributes to a reduction in brain volume. This reduction, in turn, significantly escalates the risk of stroke and dementia. This correlation has been further substantiated by genetic analyses conducted during the study.

Prevention Potential

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Moreover, the study made a startling revelation that by elevating vitamin D levels to a normal range of 50 nmol/L, there could possibly be a prevention of up to 17% of dementia cases. Such a discovery has immense repercussions on the global health scene, as it brings to the fore the critical role vitamin D plays in brain health and the prevention of neurodegenerative diseases.

Relevance to Multiple Sclerosis

Previous research has shown that low serum vitamin D levels are a recognized risk factor for the development of multiple sclerosis. However, a randomized controlled trial revealed that daily oral vitamin D3 supplements did not delay the conversion of high-risk clinically isolated syndrome to clinically definite multiple sclerosis. This reinforces the complexity of the role vitamin D plays in our bodies and the need for further research to fully understand its impact.

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