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Unraveling Hair Loss: Antidepressants, Minoxidil, and Beyond

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BNN Correspondents
New Update
Unraveling Hair Loss: Antidepressants, Minoxidil, and Beyond

Hair loss, or alopecia, extends beyond genetics and hormones, encompassing autoimmune issues, stress, hypothyroidism, nutritional deficiencies, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and notably, antidepressants. Diffuse alopecia, prevalent in patients consuming antidepressants, particularly those prescribed for mood stabilization, typically commences between the first and second week of treatment, peaking post the three-month mark.

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Antidepressants and Hair Loss: A Delicate Connection

Antidepressants can influence the telogen phase of the hair growth cycle, causing significant hair fallout. Bupropion carries a higher risk of hair loss compared to Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs). However, antidepressant-induced hair loss is generally temporary, with complete recovery within six months of discontinuing the medication. Interestingly, hair loss may be more linked to depressive states than the medications themselves.

Minoxidil: A Potential Remedy

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The article discusses the usage of minoxidil, a recurrently prescribed medication against hair loss, in its oral form. While the capsule version has its advantages, it can trigger adverse reactions, especially concerning the heart. Information regarding the trade-off between topical versus oral usage of minoxidil, side effects, recommended dosage, and administration is provided. Additionally, the importance of consulting a dermatologist prior to starting oral minoxidil treatment is emphasized.

Focusing on Friction Injuries

The article also tackles friction injuries, under-studied and under-reported wounds often misconstrued as pressure injuries. It provides information about the Skin Tear Audit Research (STAR) classification system and the classification of friction injuries by the International Skin Tear Advisory Panel (ISTAP). Furthermore, it underscores the importance of a detailed wound assessment and the dead space between the wound and the dressing.

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