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Surrey Resident Raises Concerns Over Possible Link Between Land Contamination and Cancer

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Israel Ojoko
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Surrey Resident Raises Concerns Over Possible Link Between Land Contamination and Cancer

Michele Haider, a Surrey resident, has voiced apprehensions over a potential correlation between contaminated land and cancer, a concern that emerged in the wake of her father's death.

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Syed Haider, her father, passed away in 2012, nine years after the closure of his allotment in Chertsey due to contamination issues.

The fear that the land, where their family cultivated vegetables and harvested wild blackberries, could have been polluted led Michele to voice her concerns to Runnymede Council in 2007.

Contamination Concerns and Health Implications

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Investigations into the allotments revealed the presence of heavy metals and other contaminants in the soil and water.

The medical history of the Haider family is marked by their struggle with underactive thyroid conditions, which affected both Michele and her mother. Furthermore, Syed Haider was diagnosed with a type of blood cancer known as myelodysplasia.

Although a post-mortem concluded that Syed's cause of death was heart disease, Michele's concern about the potential health repercussions of land contamination remains unassuaged.

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Tragedy Strikes Again

The family's distress was amplified by the tragic demise of seven-year-old Zane Gbangbola, which many believe was caused by toxic gases released from landfill during flooding. Runnymede Council has furnished all the relevant reports to the BBC, and measures have been taken to stop using the land for vegetable cultivation. However, lingering concerns about the long-term health effects and accountability persist.

In response to these concerns, Surrey County Council has embarked on environmental initiatives, including tree plantation and monitoring of sites that have seen an increase in pollution complaints.

The Environment Agency is also actively addressing issues related to illegal dumping and underreported pollutant levels. However, the question of accountability for potential health impacts linked to land contamination hangs in the balance, casting a long shadow over the residents of Surrey.

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