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Sudden Death of Egyptian Artist Spotlights Sudden Adult Death Syndrome Amid Egypt's Healthcare Triumphs

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BNN Correspondents
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Sudden Death of Egyptian Artist Spotlights Sudden Adult Death Syndrome Amid Egypt's Healthcare Triumphs

The sudden passing of notable Egyptian artist, Tareq Abdel Aziz, at the age of 55 due to a heart attack has stirred a discussion on Sudden Adult Death Syndrome (SADS). Aziz was in the midst of shooting a scene for an upcoming Ramadan series when he experienced the fatal cardiac arrest. He was promptly rushed to a hospital in Sheikh Zayed City, where despite resuscitation efforts, he succumbed to the condition. His unexpected demise echoes that of fellow Egyptian artist Mostafa Darwish, who died at 43 from a heart attack, despite having no prior heart conditions.

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Understanding Sudden Adult Death Syndrome (SADS)

According to the British Heart Foundation, SADS is characterized by an unexpected cessation of heart activity due to cardiac rhythm disturbances. Dr. Hakimia Monade, an internal medicine specialist, elucidated that irregular heartbeats leading to SADS can emerge from problems with the heart's electrical signaling, genetic diseases, high blood pressure, or structural heart diseases like valve narrowing or dilated cardiomyopathy. Symptoms may involve palpitations, a rapid heartbeat without exertion, increased pulse, dizziness, fainting, and chest pain.

Preventing Sudden Adult Death Syndrome

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Prevention of this syndrome involves healthy lifestyle practices, regular monitoring, and potentially medications to manage irregular heartbeats. However, the sudden nature of the syndrome often leaves little room for preparation or intervention.

Egypt's Health Diplomacy and the Fight Against Hepatitis C

In other health news, Egypt recently achieved a significant milestone. The World Health Organization announced that Egypt has reached the 'gold level' in eliminating Hepatitis C, a result of a national campaign that started in the early 2000s and peaked in 2014. Egypt surpassed WHO's benchmarks by diagnosing 87% of those with the disease and providing curative treatment to 93% of those diagnosed. The country has thus managed to reduce its Hepatitis C prevalence rate from one of the highest globally to a mere 0.38%.

Moreover, Egypt is extending its fight against Hepatitis C beyond its borders. The country is donating medical supplies and sharing expertise with other African nations, aiming to treat a million patients on the continent. This move is seen as a step towards health diplomacy and international collaboration. This is especially crucial given that WHO statistics reveal that 300,000 people die annually from Hepatitis C complications, such as liver fibrosis and cancer.

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