Advertisment

SEMA ReACT Consortium Launches Study to Enhance Malaria Response in Rural Africa

author-image
Sakchi Khandelwal
New Update
SEMA ReACT Consortium Launches Study to Enhance Malaria Response in Rural Africa

In a groundbreaking initiative, a consortium named SEMA ReACT is launching an observational study aimed at enhancing emergency responses for severe malaria cases in rural Sub-Saharan Africa. The study, centred on Zambia, Tanzania, and the Democratic Republic of Congo (DR Congo), is helmed by the Medicines for Malaria Venture (MMV).

Advertisment

The Study and Its Mechanism

The study is designed to evaluate the effectiveness of administering artesunate rectal capsules as an initial intervention for patients lacking immediate access to health facilities. In some regions, travel to hospitals can take over six hours, which highlights the necessity for locally applied interventions. The study will also track clinical outcomes and signs of potential drug resistance following the administration of oral artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs).

Collaborative Effort

Advertisment

The initiative is a collaborative effort involving various organizations. The Tropical Diseases Research Centre (TDRC) in Zambia is leading the scientific research. The social science aspect is overseen by the University of Kinshasa in DR Congo, while Tanzania's National Institute of Medical Research is conducting the molecular analysis.

Malaria: A Persistent Challenge

The World Health Organisation (WHO) has reported an increase in malaria deaths, with 625,000 in 2020, a slight decrease to 619,000 in 2021, but coupled with a rise in infections during the same period. Africa bears the brunt of the cases and fatalities, with children under five being the most affected. Despite the success of ACTs, challenges in eradicating malaria continue to persist.

The research is being funded by a European consortium that includes the European and Developing Countries Clinical Trials Partnership, the Swiss State Secretariat for Education, Research and Innovation, and the Global Health Institute at the University of Antwerp.

Advertisment
Advertisment