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Promising Schizophrenia Treatment: Clinical Trial Shows rTMS Enhances Memory

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Aqsa Younas Rana
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Promising Schizophrenia Treatment: Clinical Trial Shows rTMS Enhances Memory

In a breakthrough for schizophrenia treatment, a new clinical trial using repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has shown significant improvement in the memory of affected patients. The study, published in Neuropsychopharmacology Reports, provides fresh hope for those diagnosed with the disorder, often marred by cognitive deficits. It illustrates that rTMS, a non-invasive brain stimulation method, could potentially enhance certain aspects of memory in patients.

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rTMS and Its Impact on Memory

The study involved 50 patients diagnosed with schizophrenia and 18 healthy controls. rTMS uses magnetic fields to induce electric currents in brain tissue, a technique that has proven beneficial in improving event-based prospective memory in these patients. Prospective memory is the ability to remember to carry out future tasks, and it is categorized into two types: event-based, where an action is triggered by an external event, and time-based, where an action is performed at a specific time. Patients with schizophrenia commonly struggle with prospective memory, hindering their daily lives.

Significant Improvements in Event-Based Memory

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At the beginning of the trial, schizophrenia patients exhibited significantly lower scores in both types of prospective memory compared to the healthy controls. Post the active rTMS treatment, however, patients showed significant improvements in event-based prospective memory. Their performance was at par with that of the controls, indicating the potential of rTMS as a therapeutic option for enhancing this particular aspect of memory in schizophrenia patients.

Limited Effect on Time-Based Memory

Despite the positive impact on event-based memory, the treatment did not show similar benefits on time-based prospective memory. The study's co-corresponding author, Su-Xia Li, MD, PhD, of Peking University in China, has suggested that further research is necessary to explore this discrepancy and broaden the understanding of the therapy's potential.

The results of this trial are indicative of the potential of rTMS in schizophrenia treatment. However, they are limited to the effects of rTMS on prospective memory and do not address other cognitive deficits associated with schizophrenia. As such, while the findings provide hope and a new direction for future research, they are but one piece of the puzzle in the quest for comprehensive schizophrenia treatment.

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