Advertisment

Outbreak of Mysterious Canine Respiratory Disease in Washington State

author-image
Quadri Adejumo
New Update
Outbreak of Mysterious Canine Respiratory Disease in Washington State

Washington State is grappling with an outbreak of a mysterious respiratory disease in dogs, dubbed as the atypical Canine Infectious Respiratory Disease Complex (CIRDC). The Washington State Department of Agriculture (WSDA) has recorded 16 cases since August 2023, with the highest number of reports emanating from King County.

Advertisment

Unveiling the Atypical CIRDC

The disease, first identified in August 2023, is characterized by symptoms such as lethargy, coughing, nasal and ocular discharge, and in severe cases, signs of pneumonia. Distinct from the typical CIRDC, this atypical form has now spread to several states, including Oregon and Idaho, with no reports of transmission to humans.

Two confirmed cases have been reported in Snohomish and Clark counties. The majority of the affected dogs are on the mend, but a small proportion have experienced serious illness, according to the WSDA. The department continues to gather information on the disease, which has been reported in about a dozen states including Oregon, where over 200 cases have been recorded in the last three months.

Advertisment

(Read Also: Court Denies Immunity to Trump in Election Interference Case)

Tracking the Spread of CIRDC

King County has been most affected with seven reports, followed by Spokane County with three, and Island County with two. Single cases have been reported in each of Pierce, Skamania, and Snohomish counties. All three cases in Spokane County have been linked to a single animal rescue organization.

Advertisment

Oregon has seen most cases clustered along the Interstate 5 corridor, with at least one reported in the Pendleton area of Eastern Oregon. Despite the spread, there is no indication of a public health risk, reassures Amber Itle, the state veterinarian.

(Read Also: Emerging Climate Technologies Attract Significant Investments Amid Global Warming Concerns)

Unravelling the Mystery

Advertisment

Researchers at the University of New Hampshire Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory (NHVDL) may have found a breakthrough in understanding the disease. By using genetic sequencing of samples from 70 dogs across Rhode Island, Massachusetts, and New Hampshire over the last two years, they identified a segment of the genome of a previously uncharacterized bacteria, potentially causing the illness.

As the mystery of this disease unfolds, health officials and researchers continue their work to understand this disease better and ensure the safety of our canine companions.

Read More 

Advertisment
Advertisment