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Monoclonal Antibody Treatments Offer New Hope in Alzheimer's Battle

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BNN Correspondents
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Monoclonal Antibody Treatments Offer New Hope in Alzheimer's Battle

In a critical development in the fight against Alzheimer's, two monoclonal antibody treatments, lecanemab and donanemab, have demonstrated a marked ability to slow the progression of the early-stage disease. This breakthrough was revealed by Dr. Remy Genthon, who highlighted the promising results of these treatments that, although not yet commercialized in France and Europe, hold significant potential in the treatment of Alzheimer's.

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Lecanemab and Donanemab: A Ray of Hope

These treatments work by reducing amyloid plaque buildup in the brain, a key characteristic of Alzheimer's disease. Both treatments have shown to decelerate cognitive and functional decline in patients. Lecanemab, already approved by the FDA in July 2023, is expected to receive the nod from the European Medicines Agency (EMA) in early 2024. Donanemab, on the other hand, is currently under review in the U.S. and may receive approval by the end of the year.

Slowing Alzheimer's Progression

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Both lecanemab and donanemab have been shown to slow the disease's progression by approximately 30% over a span of 18 months. However, these treatments are not without their share of potential side effects. These include excessive inflammatory reactions, edema, and minor bleeding. Consequently, the selection of patients for these treatments will need careful consideration to minimize complications.

Aducanumab: A Controversial Predecessor

Another treatment, aducanumab, was approved in the U.S. in June 2021. However, it has been mired in controversy over its effectiveness. The treatment, like lecanemab and donanemab, targets amyloid plaques but has faced questions over its ability to slow cognitive decline. Despite the controversy, the development and approval of aducanumab marked a significant step forward in the fight against Alzheimer's, paving the way for the development of lecanemab and donanemab.

As Alzheimer's continues to pose a global health challenge, the advent of treatments like lecanemab and donanemab brings renewed hope. While these treatments are not a cure, they represent a significant step in slowing the disease's progression and improving the quality of life for those affected by Alzheimer’s.

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