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Menopause and Dementia Risk: A Groundbreaking Study

A groundbreaking study led by Dr. Zahinoor Ismail at the University of Calgary reveals potential links between severe menopausal symptoms and dementia risk. The research emphasizes holistic approaches to managing symptoms, including seeking support from a psychotherapist, nourishing community, and adopting skincare practices.

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Israel Ojoko
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Menopause and Dementia Risk: A Groundbreaking Study

Menopause and Dementia Risk: A Groundbreaking Study

Menopause: A Significant Marker for Dementia Risk?

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A groundbreaking study led by Dr. Zahinoor Ismail at the University of Calgary is shedding new light on the effects of menopause on the brain. The research, which involves 2,400 participants, suggests that severe menopausal symptoms could act as early warning signs for dementia.

The Link Between Menopause and Dementia

The study, currently in its final stages, focuses on the cognitive and behavioral impact of menopausal symptoms in post-menopausal women. Results are to be updated annually, with the hope of being published this spring. According to Dr. Ismail, "If left untreated, menopausal symptoms may be predictive markers for cognitive decline and dementia."

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This research is particularly significant as it challenges the sociocultural perception of menopause as merely a physical transition. By revealing potential links between menopause and dementia, the study underscores the importance of understanding menopause as a holistic process that affects not just the body, but also the mind.

Menopause: A Natural Process, Not an Illness

In line with this holistic approach, Anna Freixas, a retired professor of Psychology and a feminist psychologist, has updated her book 'Nuestra menopausia: una versión no oficial' after 17 years. Freixas argues against the sociocultural perception of menopause as an illness and criticizes the use of menopausal hormone therapy (MHT).

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"Menopause is a natural and normal process, not a disease," Freixas asserts. She emphasizes the need to talk about menopause and dismantle myths, stigmas, and taboos associated with it. Freixas believes that language is not innocent and suggests using 'signs' instead of 'symptoms' to describe menopause.

The Impact of Menopause on Women's Health

The University of Calgary study also highlights the various aspects of menopause, including its impact on hormonal balance, hair health, bone density, cardiovascular health, skin health, mental health, and overall well-being. It underscores the importance of understanding the hormonal changes during menopause and how they can affect different aspects of a woman's health.

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Moreover, the research emphasizes the need for holistic approaches to managing menopausal symptoms, such as seeking support from a psychotherapist, nourishing community, and adopting skincare practices to maintain skin health. The study also discusses the connection between menopause and conditions such as osteoarthritis, osteoporosis, rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, and fibromyalgia.

In conclusion, this ongoing research at the University of Calgary underscores the importance of understanding menopause beyond its physical manifestations. By revealing potential links between menopause and dementia, the study highlights the need for a more comprehensive approach to women's health in midlife and beyond.

As Freixas rightly points out, menopause is not a disease, but a natural process that merits open discussion and understanding. By talking about menopause and demystifying it, we can help women navigate this transition with greater ease and confidence.

Key Points:

  • A study led by Dr. Zahinoor Ismail at the University of Calgary suggests that severe menopausal symptoms could act as early warning signs for dementia.
  • The research, involving 2,400 participants, underscores the importance of understanding menopause as a holistic process that affects both the body and mind.
  • Anna Freixas, a retired professor of Psychology, argues against the sociocultural perception of menopause as an illness and emphasizes the need for open discussion about it.
  • The study highlights the importance of holistic approaches to managing menopausal symptoms, including seeking support from a psychotherapist, nourishing community, and adopting skincare practices.
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