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Long COVID: NIH Invests $515 Million in RECOVER Initiative to Address Ongoing Health Crisis

Long COVID affects 1 in 9 adults post-COVID-19, leading to NIH's $515M investment in the RECOVER Initiative. The program targets understanding, diagnosis, and treatment development for this pressing health concern, including studies on pregnant individuals and children.

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BNN Correspondents
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Long COVID: NIH Invests $515 Million in RECOVER Initiative to Address Ongoing Health Crisis

Long COVID: NIH Invests $515 Million in RECOVER Initiative to Address Ongoing Health Crisis

In the United States, an alarming trend has emerged: approximately one in nine adults who have had COVID-19 continue to grapple with debilitating symptoms, a condition now known as Long COVID. To address this burgeoning healthcare crisis, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) recently announced a substantial investment of $515 million into the Researching COVID to Enhance Recovery (RECOVER) Initiative.

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A Nationwide Battle Against Long COVID

The RECOVER Initiative, a nationwide research program, aims to comprehend, diagnose, and develop potential treatments for Long COVID. The NIH's investment, which will span the next four years, is a testament to the urgency of addressing this issue, as nearly 90,000 adults and children across 300 clinical research sites participate in observational studies.

The RECOVER Initiative: Identifying Symptom Clusters and Informing Treatment

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Some of the key findings from the RECOVER Initiative include the identification of major symptom clusters, which have proven invaluable for clinical researchers in diagnosing Long COVID in their patients. These discoveries are helping to inform diagnosis, treatment, and care for those suffering from this condition.

New Studies on Long COVID in Pregnant Individuals and Children

Two recent studies, presented at the Society for Maternal Fetal Medicine's annual meeting and published in the journal Pediatrics, have shed light on the prevalence and impact of Long COVID in pregnant individuals and children. The first study revealed that 9.3% of pregnant people experienced symptoms six months or more after being infected with COVID-19, with common symptoms including fatigue and dizziness. Factors such as obesity, chronic anxiety or depression, and requiring supplemental oxygen while sick increased the risk of Long COVID.

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The second study found that up to 6 million children have developed Long COVID, with a third still experiencing symptoms a year after initial infection. These symptoms included breathing problems and fatigue. Additionally, the research highlighted a higher risk of autoimmune conditions like type 1 diabetes in children post-COVID infection.

Long COVID has also been linked to viral-borne brain injury in patients with symptoms such as brain fog, according to a study conducted by the US National Institutes of Health. This research emphasizes the importance of further investigation into the mechanisms behind Long COVID, as well as the role vaccines may play in reducing its risk.

In conclusion, the rising prevalence of Long COVID in the United States necessitates further research and investment into understanding and treating the condition. The RECOVER Initiative, backed by a $515 million investment from the NIH, represents a significant step forward in addressing this urgent healthcare crisis. As researchers continue to uncover the complexities of Long COVID, their findings will prove invaluable in providing much-needed relief to the millions affected by this lingering and debilitating condition.

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