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Inquiry Reveals Decade-Long Offenses by Mortuary Worker due to NHS Failings

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BNN Correspondents
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Inquiry Reveals Decade-Long Offenses by Mortuary Worker due to NHS Failings

In a shocking revelation, an inquiry into the conduct of a mortuary worker in England has uncovered a decade-long saga of offenses, perpetrated in the shadows of grave systemic failings at the National Health Service (NHS) hospitals where he was employed. The investigation has peeled back the layers on a deeply unsettling case that points to a critical lack of oversight, inadequate safeguarding measures, and potential breakdowns in internal protocols meant to protect the dignity of the deceased.

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Abuse Undetected for Over a Decade

The mortuary worker, David Fuller, was found to have sexually abused the bodies of at least 101 women and girls aged between nine and 100. His gruesome actions spanned 15 years during his employment at the now-closed Kent and Sussex Hospital and the Tunbridge Wells Hospital. Throughout this period, the severe inadequacies within the system allowed Fuller to commit his offenses undetected, a fact that has ignited concerns about the practices at NHS mortuaries.

Investigation Reveals Serious Failings

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The government initiated an independent inquiry two years ago to scrutinize how Fuller managed to carry out his disturbing crimes without detection. The probe's first phase focused on Fuller's employer, Maidstone and Tunbridge Wells NHS Trust. The investigation found that there were failures in management, governance, and regulation, creating an environment that enabled Fuller to continue his horrifying deeds without suspicion.

Recommendations for Robust Reforms

The report concludes with 17 crucial recommendations aimed at preventing similar atrocities at the Maidstone and Tunbridge Wells NHS Trust. The proposed measures include modifications in staffing arrangements and the installation of CCTV surveillance in sensitive areas. This comprehensive inquiry is likely to trigger a reassessment of current procedures and spark the implementation of more robust systems to ensure such offenses are promptly identified and addressed, thereby securing the dignity of those in the care of NHS mortuaries.

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