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Infantile Amnesia: A Dive into the Mysteries of our Forgotten Infancy

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BNN Correspondents
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Infantile Amnesia: A Dive into the Mysteries of our Forgotten Infancy

Often, we find ourselves unable to recollect the memories from our infancy, a phenomenon widely known as infantile amnesia. This universal loss of early childhood memories, however, is not a result of an inability to store information during the early years, but rather due to the brain's undeveloped capacity to weave information into intricate neural patterns known as memories. In the tender years of two to four, children typically lack the capacity for episodic memory, which pertains to the details of specific events.

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Decoding Memory Storage

Memories are stored across the brain's cortex, with different areas processing different types of memory. For instance, the auditory cortex is responsible for sounds, while the visual cortex handles visual memories. The hippocampus, a crucial region in the brain, binds these disparate pieces together. Nevertheless, this binding process does not fully mature until children approach the age range of two to four years, rendering children younger than this age incapable of recording certain episodes. Comparing the cortex to a field of flowers, Patricia Bauer, a psychology professor at Emory University, likens the hippocampus to the force that binds these flowers into a bouquet, symbolizing the interconnected neural patterns of memory.

Infantile Amnesia and Its Implications

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Infantile amnesia, by its nature, witnesses the progressive development of a child's cerebral and cognitive abilities. Various studies have attempted to unveil whether it's possible to bypass this stage and remember events from birth. A few years ago, light's impact on childhood amnesia piqued the interest of researchers. More recently, a study explored the correlation between childhood amnesia and brain development in children with autism or autism spectrum disorders.

Unlocking the Enigma of Infantile Amnesia

Researchers have suggested that infantile amnesia is due to a failure to recover memories, as the neural pathways to access them are not naturally stimulated. The initial stages of brain development during childhood could determine this childhood amnesia, differently in autistic children and in children without autistic disorders. The paradox of childhood amnesia unveils the intricacy of memory formation in early childhood. Forgotten memories may linger, but the complexities of brain development and the role of immune activation during pregnancy shed light on why we can't readily recall these precious early moments.

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