Advertisment

EPA Mandates Reporting of 'Forever Chemicals' in Drinking Water

author-image
BNN Correspondents
New Update
EPA Mandates Reporting of 'Forever Chemicals' in Drinking Water

In a landmark decision, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has announced that, effective from November 30, drinking water utilities are mandated to report concentrations of certain per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) above four parts per trillion. Commonly known as "forever chemicals" due to their persistent nature in the environment, PFAS are synthetic chemicals widely used across various industries, including textile manufacturing and aviation. They have been linked to significant health risks such as cancer and immune system impairment.

Advertisment

The Impending Task: Setting Standards

The responsibility of establishing drinking water standards for approximately six different PFAS compounds falls on the EPA's Office of Water, led by Radhika Fox. The first reports reflecting these new regulations are due on July 1, 2025. The move marks a significant step in the fight against these harmful chemicals, reflecting the growing concern about the impacts of PFAS on human health and the environment.

Cost Implications: Who Pays The Price?

Advertisment

The financial implications of this decision are substantial. The infrastructure investments necessary to treat water for PFAS at the specified levels are estimated to reach around $47 billion, with continuing annual costs of approximately $700 million. The financial weight of these measures will most likely be seen in the water rates paid by consumers unless additional funding is obtained from Congress.

Cheryl Norton, the Chief Operating Officer of American Water, emphasized that the treatment costs should be shouldered by the polluters, not by the consumers. This sentiment echoes a broader principle in environmental policy: the polluter pays principle.

Interim Measures and Long-Term Solutions

While the EPA and organizations like the Environmental Working Group acknowledge the current presence of PFAS in tap water and the need for more efficient treatment systems, consumers are left to grapple with the issue in the meantime. As an interim measure, experts recommend filtering water at home to reduce exposure to PFAS.

The decision to regulate PFAS in drinking water is a significant move towards protecting public health. However, the journey towards cleaner, safer drinking water is far from over. It requires continuous effort, significant financial investment, and the political will to hold polluters accountable for their actions.

Advertisment
Advertisment