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Chiropractic Spinal Manipulation: A Potential Game-Changer for Post-Operative Sciatica Patients

A recent study by UH Connor Whole Health has indicated the potential of chiropractic spinal manipulation in reducing the need for additional lumbar surgery in adults suffering from sciatica.

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Nitish Verma
New Update
Chiropractic Spinal Manipulation: A Potential Game-Changer for Post-Operative Sciatica Patients

A new chapter in the field of spinal health has been unfurled, courtesy of a recent study out of University Hospitals (UH) Connor Whole Health. The research, centered around chiropractic spinal manipulation (CSM), has signaled a beacon of hope for adults grappling with sciatica after low back surgery.

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Insights from the Research

The study, published in the esteemed journal, BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, bore the title, 'Association between spinal manipulative therapy and lumbar spine reoperation after discectomy: a retrospective cohort study'. The primary objective of the research was to determine if CSM could play a pivotal role in reducing the need for subsequent lumbar spine surgeries.

Methodology and Findings

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In a bid to glean in-depth insights, the research team tapped into the data from a United States health records network, scrutinizing cases spanning two decades, from 2003 to 2023. The study comprised a sample of 756 patients, with a mean age of 61. To create comparable groups for a thorough analysis, the researchers harnessed the power of propensity matching.

The results were significant. Patients who underwent CSM saw a staggering 45% reduction in the likelihood of additional lumbar surgery, compared to their counterparts who received usual medical care.

A Note of Caution

While the outcomes of the study are indeed promising, the lead author, Robert J Trager, DC, has stressed the need for prudence in interpreting these results. The primary reason for this caution lies in the observational nature of the study. Consequently, the research team has advocated for conducting more comprehensive studies to delve deeper into these findings, with a focus on pain, disability, and safety outcomes.

The team also suggested that the positive outcomes could be influenced by the non-surgical interactions with a clinician, thereby necessitating comparisons with other treatments such as physical therapy or acupuncture.

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