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A Tale of Two Tragedies: Nepal and Columbia

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BNN Correspondents
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A Tale of Two Tragedies: Nepal and Columbia

In the remote village of Suvakot in Barekot Municipality-7, Jajarkot, Nepal, a 65-year-old man named Hariyo Damai tragically lost his life. Stricken by paralysis two years prior, Hariyo had been living under a tarpaulin, or tripal, since an earthquake damaged his home. His living conditions, suffused with hardship, were compounded by fever and respiratory complications that surfaced recently and persisted for a week. Despite preparations being made for his transfer to a health facility, Hariyo succumbed to his deteriorating health.

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A Life Under the Tarpaulin

For Hariyo, the past two years were a testament to human endurance. Paralyzed, he had been living under a makeshift shelter, struggling against the elements and his condition alike. The quake had left his house unsafe, forcing him to reside under a tripal, a common sight in this earthquake-prone region. His story is a stark reminder of the challenges that the elderly and disabled face in remote regions, particularly in the aftermath of natural disasters.

The Final Struggle

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Hariyo's final days were marked by an escalating health crisis. Besieged by fever and respiratory issues, he battled his ailments in his humble tripal abode. His deteriorating health, however, necessitated immediate medical attention. Preparations were underway to move him to a health facility when he breathed his last. The news of his passing was confirmed by Vishal Kiran Basnet, the ward chairman.

A Tale of Two Cities

Across the globe, in Columbia, a similarly tragic tale unfolded. The body of a 49-year-old man, Anthony Wayne McCullough, was discovered in an abandoned motel. Forensic analysis revealed that McCullough had been dead for about two to three weeks and that a multi-drug overdose, including methamphetamines and fentanyl, was the cause of death. The motel, once a bustling facility, had been closed since March 1 and was demolished shortly after the macabre discovery.

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