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Tesla Engineer Brutally Attacked by Robot at Giga Texas Factory

A Tesla engineer was brutally attacked by a malfunctioning robot at the Giga Texas factory, raising concerns about the safety of robotic automation and potential underreporting of injuries at the factory.

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Waqas Arain
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Tesla Engineer Brutally Attacked by Robot at Giga Texas Factory

In a shocking incident, a Tesla engineer was brutally attacked by a robot at the company's Giga Texas factory. The malfunctioning machine, designed to handle aluminum car parts, pinned the engineer, causing severe injuries with its metal claws. This horrifying event was detailed in a 2021 injury report submitted to local and federal regulators, shedding light on the potential dangers of robotic automation in the workplace.

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A Bloody Encounter

The report, reviewed by DailyMail.com, recounts the engineer wrestling to free himself from the robot's grasp, falling into a chute designed for collecting scrap aluminum, and leaving behind a bloody trail. The incident resulted in an open wound on the engineer's left hand, leading workers to hit the emergency shutdown button to halt the violent malfunction.

Underreported Injuries

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While the report states that the engineer did not require time off work, concerns about the potential underreporting of injuries at the factory have emerged. An attorney representing Tesla's contract workers suggests that the actual number of injuries could be higher than reported. This assertion is backed by the unreported death of a construction worker in September 2021 and conversations with other employees.

Questionable Safety Practices

The Workers Defense Project has lodged a complaint with the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), alleging that Tesla's contractors provided false safety certificates to some workers. This incident is not an isolated one, with historical patterns of underreporting injuries at Tesla. Several investigations have revealed the misclassification of on-the-job accidents to avoid regulatory scrutiny. The Giga Texas incident amplifies the ongoing concerns about the safety of robotic automation in the workplace.

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