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Bankruptcy Fraud Scheme: Fenner and Birkley Bag Jail Terms

Brian Fenner and Dennis Birkley were sentenced for a fraudulent vehicle transaction scheme that exploited bankrupt individuals, resulting in over $1M in fraudulent gains. Their sentencing serves as a stark reminder of the consequences of engaging in fraudulent activity.

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BNN Correspondents
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Bankruptcy Fraud Scheme: Fenner and Birkley Bag Jail Terms

Bankruptcy Fraud Scheme: Fenner and Birkley Bag Jail Terms

On a cold morning in a US federal court, Brian Fenner and Dennis Birkley, two men who had schemed the vulnerable and the bankrupt, received their just desserts. The duo was handed down sentences of 77 and 60 months respectively for their roles in a fraudulent vehicle transaction scheme that preyed on those on the brink of financial ruin.

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A Deceptive Promise

Between 2013 and 2016, Fenner, the mastermind of the operation, advertised a too-good-to-be-true 'free bankruptcy program'. He vowed to shoulder bankruptcy attorney fees for individuals, but there was a catch – they had to transfer their vehicle titles to him. The bait was set, and many desperate individuals, teetering on the edge of bankruptcy, fell into the trap.

A Web of Lies

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Instead of providing the promised assistance, Fenner implemented an elaborate scheme. He charged over-the-top fees for towing the vehicles to his lots in Indianapolis and then coerced the debtors into signing liens on their vehicles. The next step in this intricate web of deceit involved phantom auctions, where he transferred the vehicles' ownership to his accomplice, Birkley.

The Final Blow

With the vehicles now under his control, Birkley would then secure clean titles from the Indiana Bureau of Motor Vehicles and sell the cars at market value. This clever yet diabolical scheme resulted in over US$1 million in fraudulent gains, exploiting the vulnerable and leaving them even more financially crippled.

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A Just Sentence

When their illicit activities came to light, the court acted swiftly. Fenner and Birkley were convicted on multiple counts of fraud and money laundering, and were ordered to pay $49,045.84 each in restitution. Fenner, who failed to surrender for his prison term, was re-arrested and received an additional seven months on his sentence, making his total 77 months in the federal penitentiary.

Through their illicit activities, Fenner and Birkley not only exploited individuals in financial crisis but also undermined the very essence of bankruptcy protection. Their sentencing serves as a stark reminder of the severe consequences of engaging in fraudulent activity and exploiting the vulnerable.

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