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Taiwan's Ministry of Environment Questions Low Ranking in Climate Change Performance Index

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Bijay Laxmi
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Taiwan's Ministry of Environment Questions Low Ranking in Climate Change Performance Index

In an unexpected turn of events, Taiwan's Ministry of Environment has openly challenged the nation's low ranking in the Climate Change Performance Index (CCPI). The recent CCPI results, unveiled at the 28th U.N. Climate Change Conference, ranked Taiwan 61 out of 67, a noticeable drop from last year's position of 57.

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CCPI's Controversial Ranking Methodology

The CCPI, a tool developed by German organizations, uses a spectrum of parameters including greenhouse gas emissions, renewable energy, energy use, and climate policy to evaluate countries. Taiwan's performance was 'very low' in emissions and energy use, and 'low' in renewable energy and climate policy. The Ministry, however, criticized the CCPI's methodology, calling it 'controversial' and asserting that it does not accurately reflect Taiwan's efforts in reducing emissions and improving energy efficiency.

They pointed to the CCPI's per capita emissions comparisons and the assigned pathways for achieving the Paris Agreement targets, which, they argue, seem to favor larger or less developed countries, representing an unfair burden on Taiwan.

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(Read Also: U.S. Vows to Defend Taiwan Strait, Affirms Commitment to Regional Stability)

Taiwan's Performance in Other Climate-Related Surveys

Despite the CCPI's low ranking, Taiwan has shown promising results in other climate-related surveys. The Emissions Database for Global Atmospheric Research (EDGAR) reported a 7-percent decrease in emissions from Taiwan, placing it second only to Japan in Asia. This stark contrast raises questions about the CCPI's ranking process and its fairness.

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(Read Also: China Objects to Taiwan’s Participation in COP28; US Initiates Informal NAFTA Discussions)

Critics Question CCPI's Rankings

Critics, including Chao Chia-wei, an adjunct assistant professor at National Taiwan University, also questioned the CCPI's rankings, noting discrepancies with other climate performance assessments. This controversy sheds light on the challenges of assessing and comparing national climate change performances and underscores the need for clear, fair, and universally accepted standards.

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